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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – June 11th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

A nice moment recently.  This past season one of the boys I’ve coached for several years has had a very tough go of it.  It’s been especially frustrating for him because he was coming off an amazing season last time out.  He went from catching everything and making big plays to dropping pass after pass.  We worked with him a lot, but it never clicked like it had for him and after a while the quarterback lost faith in him, and the ball went to him less.  You could just tell his confidence was gone.

During our last game this past weekend we got near the goal line and the other team called a time out so my team (and oldest son who was my fill in assistant for the day) was surrounding me waiting for me to call the play.   I told the player I just mentioned to look me in the eyes, and I said “I’m calling this one for you because I believe in you.  I want you to believe in yourself, catch it and score.  Can you do that?”  He said he could.  And he did.  I then had a nice moment with him as he ran off the field.  Later, my older son said “You’re usually so fired up when you’re coaching but that was a nice heartwarming moment and I’m glad I was there for it.  That was cool.”  I certainly didn’t throw the pass or catch it, so I deserve no credit, but I think sometimes it’s important to let someone who is maybe a bit down know that you’re still there for them.

A great reminder about exercise.  I finished coaching my team for the season on Saturday and it’s always a let down for me when I’m done and it’s over.  After the game, my wife mentioned that she started an email address for my late brother-in-law (her youngest brother) so that we can email him as kind of like a shared journal for us to keep of him.  That night I wrote to him, and it was emotional for me.  Sunday morning, I woke up and feeling overwhelmed, anxious, and not myself.  I decided had to do something, so I put my daughter in the jogging stroller and off we went for a 5-mile run. 

Almost immediately during that run (and especially after), I felt like a different person.  The anxiety had subsided, and I felt clear-headed and myself again.  This was a great reminder for me about.  The physiology of exercise is truly amazing and does so much more than tone our bodies.  Rather than dwell on feeling sad or try and numb the pain with substances, get out and get some endorphins (the feel-good chemicals) going and you’ll notice an instant improvement in how you feel.

A great question to ask yourself.  In the book “Atomic Habits” (excellent book!)  the author makes the point that our habits form our identity.  As an example, if you regularly write each week, then part of your identity is that of a writer.  If you don’t write, this would not be the case even if you wanted to think of yourself as one.  So, the question to ask yourself is as of this second right now, what are your most common habits?  What do those habits say about who you are?

I like this simple viewpoint.  Regardless of where your life is at, you can begin changing your identity through habits at any time you choose.  If you’re out of shape and have 50 pounds to lose but are now trying to exercise and eat better, then your identity is that of someone who is getting in shape.  If you’re broke, start following habits that someone with money might.  Give real thought to your habits and what they say about you and what you’d like them to say about you.

A valuable lesson I I’ve taken from my races.  Due to COVID, I have not had an opportunity to compete in a legitimate race since March 2020.  This week I registered one that will take place in late July and am excited again.  I was speaking with someone who is doing the same race and competing in an ultramarathon (generally 31 miles minimum up to 100 miles or more) for the first time and they asked me quite a few questions.  One of the things I expressed to them was that these types of races mirror the feelings and emotions that everyday life gives us.  In other words, you’ll physically exert and challenge your body but will come away with many valuable lessons that apply to life in general.  I was then asked to provide an example.

The most valuable lesson I’ve learned in these types of races is that things will always get better, and things will always get worse.  The trick is to just accept this and never get too high or too low.  When you’re going great, enjoy the heck out of it and take full advantage.  When you’re in a low spot, keep fighting and realize that things will soon improve somehow.  Both extremes are equally valuable and necessary.  There are times in races where I’ll feel horrible for hours and then great for hours, it just depends.  Life is no different – there are ups and downs and ultimately the key is to just keep moving forward.  Sometimes this will happen with speed and enthusiasm.  Other times it’ll be slow and begrudgingly.  Ultimately, it doesn’t matter so long as you’re putting one foot in front of the other and making progress.  True in races, even more true in life. 

Some quotes I love.

“Talk about your blessings more than you talk about your burdens.” – Tim Tebow

“When they say you can’t do it, do it twice and take pics.”

“Most people don’t really want the truth.  They just want constant reassurance that what they believe is the truth.” 

“Either I will find a way, or I will make one.” – Philip Sidney

“Sick until proven healthy is the same as guilty until proven innocent.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com and go to “blog”
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – June 11th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – June 4th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

A cool experience this past week.  On Memorial Day it is common for many to do the “Murph Challenge” which is named in honor of Navy SEAL Mike Murphy who died heroically in Operation Redwing as told in the book and movie, Lone Survivor written by Marcus Luttrell (who was the only survivor).  The workout involves wearing a weighted vest and running 1 mile, then doing 100 pullups, 200 pushups, 300 air squats and then finishing with another mile run.

I did this workout myself and then my two oldest sons and their friend joined me for another 5-mile run where each of us took turns carrying the American flag.  Seeing those young men proudly carry the flag as passing cars beeped their support made me extremely proud.  Afterwards they kept talking about how cool the experience was and how glad they were they did it.  I was so proud of them and shared a “proud dad” post about it on my Instagram about the event and told my boys I would tag them and some of the Navy SEALs and special operations guys we look up to as well.  Almost immediately, our post was “liked” by Marcus Luttrell who was on the mission in which Mike Murphy died and who was his best friend.  This meant a lot to all of us, as though he approved of how we were honoring his friend and the thousands of others like him.  It was a great day of patriotism for us and an experience we’ll all remember.

Something that’s been working well for me.  For the past week, I’ve taken nothing but cold showers.  I learned this years ago from reading about Wim Hof who is the godfather of cold training.  For space purposes, I won’t go into all the specifics of how (just Google it) it works but being exposed to cold water (and cold in general) forces you to breathe in a certain way to tolerate it.  Exposure to the cold water in this fashion leads to physical and mental resiliency, less sensitivity to cold (through production of brown fat), increased testosterone, boosts in metabolism, increased energy and more.  I’d gotten away from doing this for some time but am back at it and the benefits for me have been noticeable instantly!

“I walk every day, why am I not losing weight?”  I hear this often and wanted to address it.  First, there is nothing wrong with walking and it can be great exercise.

When someone goes from being relatively sedentary to beginning to walk regularly, there is often an immediate improvement in terms of weight loss.  This is because the body is not accustomed to it and so metabolism is increased.  If you continue walking the exact same distance and pace each day, eventually your body will become more efficient and will not need to raise metabolism as much in response, and thus you won’t lose weight.  If you were to quicken your pace, increase the distance, start walking more hills or otherwise change the routine; you’d notice a change once again.  Finally, if you’re walking and moving more but not following it up with at least decent nutrition, it’ll be difficult to see any noticeable changes from just walking (or any exercise really).

Something I liked recently.  My youngest son will be 3 in July and began taking karate a couple months ago.  Some classes go well, and some don’t which is what you expect at that age.  This week he went to a class and ended up being the only student, so he had the instructor to himself.  It went ok for about 10 minutes and then went off the tracks before my wife had to end his lesson (out of respect to the instructor).  He was a bit intimidated being in class alone, and it was new for him, so we weren’t worried about it.

What I liked is that the sensei told my wife “I’m not going to tell him he did well because he didn’t “, then offered some constructive advice and explained that this is a normal part of young students’ learning.  He wasn’t upset with my son in any way, was kind to him and told him he’d see him tomorrow.  Why did I like this?  Because I think it’s wonderful when the correct behaviors are reinforced as opposed to commending those that aren’t.  He did not insult my son or hurt his feelings; he simply didn’t praise his behavior as being appropriate.  When he shows up at his next class and does well, I’m sure he’ll tell my boy that he did great and that will hopefully begin the cycle for him of knowing how to behave in class.  This is a small example to me of how good behaviors can be learned and how things that are earned are always far better than those that are simply given.

Some quotes I love.

“You won’t always be motivated that’s why you have to learn to be disciplined.” 

“Discipline is doing what you hate to do but doing it like you love it.” – Mike Tyson

“There’s free cheese in a mousetrap.” – saw this on Instagram and dug it

Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – June 4th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 28th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

Something I struggle with.  This past weekend I finished coaching a group of boys I’ve had since age 6-7.  Both of my oldest sons are also moving up into different leagues/schools and leaving teammates behind as a result.  They both expressed to me how hard this is for them and I told them I understood.

When I coach a team or train for (and then run) a big race, I put everything I have into it.  When I’m amid this, it’s amazing – I enjoy the camaraderie, the structure, the planning, everything.  But when it’s over?  I’m sad.  It leaves me kind of depressed and it feels like a part of me is missing. 

So how do I handle it?  First, I remember to have gratitude for whatever I’m missing.  I try to think of what I’ve learned and gained because of the experience and focus on the good times.  I woke up Monday morning to a Facebook post a mom wrote about me and what I meant to her son, how I understood him and helped him as a player and a man.  How can I not be grateful for things like that?  Second, I begin the process of looking for the next adventure.  The goal is not to replace what’s lost but to find something else fulfilling.  Finally, I find solace in guiding others toward the types of experiences that have been so good to me.  For example, when I hear someone talking about wanting to coach, I love to share my experiences and encourage them to do it as well.  The highs of the things I invest so much time in is incredible, the struggle for me has been learning to deal with the inevitable lows that come when it’s over.  Thankfully, that has happened with experience and time. 

What does is mean if you have arthritis?  I can tell you after 16 years in practice that what people believe arthritis to be is often wildly inaccurate.  The most basic and common type of arthritis is known as osteoarthritis or degenerative disc (or joint) disease.  This is a gradual wearing down of the joints.  It is caused by lack of motion, misalignments, injuries and can be accelerated through many lifestyle factors physically and nutritionally. 

In terms what arthritis looks like – on an x-ray or MRI you would see a loss of disc space between 2 vertebrae (or joints), altering of the shape of the vertebrae/joint and the formation of calcium deposits that often look like hooks called osteophytes (bone spurs).  These changes can be mild to incredibly severe.  Arthritic changes cause lack of mobility, pain, and other nerve related symptoms to be more common due to less room for the nerves to operate.  The good news is that this type of arthritis is not genetic, can be prevented and can be treated (but not reversed). 

Other types of arthritis include rheumatoid and psoriatic, but these are less common and are often genetic because they are an autoimmune reaction.  If you want to avoid or help arthritis I recommend moving more (exercise), spinal care (adjustments, stretching, etc.) and eating less sugar and inflammatory foods.

Do you know how old you’ll be when your daughter is in college?  As most of you know, I have 4 children.  My older two (11 and 14) are from my first marriage and my younger two are with my wife now (9 months and almost 3).  Since I am 45 years old, quite often people ask me if I know how old I’ll be when my daughter graduates from high school, college, etc.  Naturally, I am aware of this math and quite honestly when my wife was pregnant with our little ones it was something that bothered me a bit. 

However, I began to realize I was focusing unnecessarily on arbitrary numbers and my viewpoint was wrong.  Instead of doing that, I always focus on the quality of time I spend with all my children and being present when I’m with them.  In addition, I do things each day to strengthen myself physically, mentally, spiritually, financially, as a leader and more.  The reason I do this is to make sure I set a great example for them while also giving myself the best opportunity to maximize the number of years I have with them (by maintaining great health).  This is how I honor my family, by seeking more time with them not only now but many years from now.  That’s the only math that concerns me now.

Something beautiful I saw recently.  A couple weeks back, I’d just finished coaching my team and my son and I were watching his older brother play.  Suddenly, we heard louder than normal cheering coming from the field next to us.  We looked over to see a young man in a wheelchair with a football in his hand being pushed by his teammates toward and into the endzone while the other team made a nice show of trying to “tackle” him.  After the score, he was wheeled around the field and the look on his face was priceless.  He was so proud and slapping high fives with everyone he went by.  The cheering went on for probably 5 minutes and my son looked up at me smiling and knowing this would get me emotional. Sometimes it takes a moment like this for you to appreciate the human spirit and to be truly grateful for all you have.

Some quotes I love.

“There is timing in the whole life of a warrior, in his thriving and declining, in his harmony and discord.” – Musashi Miyamoto

“At the end of all our exploring we will arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.” – T.S. Elliot. Four Quartets

“Many people will panic to find a charger before their phone dies.  But won’t panic to find a plan before their dream dies.” – Elon Musk

“Your beliefs don’t make you a good person…your behavior does!” – Inky Johnson

“Fear is not a virtue.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com and go to “blog”
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 28th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 21st

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

An analogy I think works.  Your immune system is a lot like your musculoskeletal system.  How do you strengthen your muscles and bones?  You expose them to a stress by challenging them in some fashion – exercising, lifting weights, etc.  These demands cause your body to think that these stresses will continue, and it adapts by increasing bone density and muscle strength.  Conversely, if you do no workouts and are not physically active, the body has no reason to get stronger and so it weakens.

The immune system operates in a similar fashion.  When it is exposed to germs/bacteria/viruses it is forced to get stronger to better protect you going forward.  If your body is not exposed to these then it will get weaker.  This also means that when you are eventually exposed to anything (even mild), your body will have a diminished ability to fight it off.  So, should you head into a lab and get exposed to everything and anything?  Of course not, just as you wouldn’t load a bar with 400 pounds on day 1 of your fitness routine.  The key is repetitive stimuli causing a progressive but steady strengthening of the body so it can protect you better. 

A mistake I often see as a chiropractor.  A lot of the conditions I see in practice are easy to fix if we can get started soon after they begin.  However, patients often wait so long to come in that something relatively simple is made more complex by the condition being worsened and/or overcompensation of other areas occurring.  As a simple example, if we can get to neck or back pain soon after the onset, it can often be fixed within a few days but if not, it may take weeks.  Motor vehicle accident cases that I’m able to begin treatment on soon after the crash will often need weeks less of care to fully heal than if they wait weeks or months to seek treatment. 

In general, if something has gone on for more than a few days (week at the latest) then it’s not simply a muscular issue and likely has a structural and/or neurological component so seeking treatment is a good idea.  I try to impress upon my patients that it’s always better to be a little bit early seeking care than it is to be a little late. 

A good lesson recently.  My older sons and I have been watching a football docuseries recently.  One of the main characters being followed in the show is a high energy, passionate man that is great to the kids he coaches and is a leader within his community.  In a particular episode, because he is a mayor of his town, they dug in a little to his politics which happen to be the opposite of mine and my family.  As one of our favorite people on the show, my sons asked me if this changed how I felt about him, and the answer was no.

What I explained to them was that I had no desire to only interact or see people with beliefs identical to mine.  I also told them that given the choice, I will always take someone that is invested in people to the degree this gentleman is over someone that merely sides with some of my beliefs.  When you’re legitimately good to the people around you I think that speaks far more about you than anything else. 

Something I loved this week.  There’s a podcast I listen to called “The Order of Man” that centers around helping men be better fathers, providers, protectors, leaders, etc.  Recently, the host got on a topic and gave the advice of “know your lines.”  He did not mean this in terms of memorizing material.  Rather, it means what are your lines in the sand?  Where do you draw your lines?  What won’t you compromise on?  At what point is it time for you to stand up? 

This appealed to me because it follows along with something I preach to my children constantly – that every person must have a code.  Our code dictates our behavior because it outlines what we can or cannot allow.  Anything that crosses the “line” or goes against the code cannot be permitted without a fight or standing.  I like to believe I have a strong code that I’ve developed over the years and it doesn’t matter if it’s a friend, family, stranger, or the government, I will not and cannot break it.  Give some thought to this so you can “know your lines.”

Some quotes I love.

“You needn’t fear the darkness if you have the light inside.”

“For those that I love, I would do great and terrible things.”

“The hardest challenge is to be yourself in a world where everyone is trying to make you be somebody else.” – E.E. Cummings

“Leadership is a journey that never ends.  There is no finish line in the race to become a good leader.” – Jason Redman

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com and go to “blog”
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 21st
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 14th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

A health question to always consider.  Patients will often ask my opinion on non-chiropractic health issues, so I have many discussions on a range of topics from medications to surgeries and more.  These conversations often begin with “well, my doctor thinks I should…”  Then the patient will go on to tell me what the doctor thinks they should take/get/undergo/etc.  What I always encourage patients to try and decipher is if the recommendation is specific to them or merely a general recommendation that 100 out of 100 people would get from that doctor.  I encourage this because specific health advice is far more valuable than one size fits all suggestions. 

For example, does your doctor think it would be great for you personally to get a certain shot/surgery/take a certain medication/etc. or is it something that he/she would recommend to everyone/anyone regardless of circumstance?  The point is not to be critical of the advice, merely for you to understand the difference between something specific to you and your health versus a general recommendation.  In chiropractic it is common for a chiropractor to tell patients they need 3 visits per week for X number of weeks to resolve a condition.  Is this necessary for certain cases?  Of course.  Do I think it should be recommended for every person regardless?  No.  Again, not to say either can’t have benefit but it’s important to decide for yourself when you’re getting specific advice for you versus something given to everyone.  If your financial planner gave the same advice to everyone regardless of financial position or tolerance for risk, you wouldn’t be happy – this same principle should apply to your health as well.

A great lesson from an interesting source.  I was listening to Joe Rogan’s podcast last weekend as he interviewed Dave Chappelle.  He mentioned that after he’d been on with another fellow comedian last year, they’d both read the comments online that people gave about the show.  These comedians have been on stage in front of millions, been heckled and have dealt with everything big time performers would.  So how did it affect these two hardened performers when they read the comments?  It got to them.  They questioned themselves and felt insecure.  Both admitted it, one even said it sent him into a tailspin for days.

What’s the lesson?  It’s important to consider who is criticizing you and why.  As a coach I give feedback to players constantly, but I never make it personal.  This allows for correction of mistakes but not the creation of anxieties or insecurities.  On the other end of the spectrum, I sometimes hear “chiropractic is witchcraft” or something stupid like that.  When I do, I realize immediately this is not an attempt to begin a discussion but is meant to simply be disparaging.  Unfortunately, there are a lot of angry people out there that will say mean things and think nothing of it.  Negative people are like a pile of poop – you can certainly step right on it and it’ll be a mess but it’s better just to avoid it and go around. 

Why do you still get so nervous/excited?  This was a question my son asked me last week right before we left for our football game.  I’m known to my kids for being “chippy” before our games – a little bit more edgy, more intense, etc.  I’ve coached for years and have played in many games during my own career, so he was curious why I still get like that.  My answer is that it’s because I care.  If I’m involved in something, then it matters to me and I give it all I have and play for keeps.  When there are no stakes, there is no pressure because you don’t care all that much about the outcome.  I still get pumped up, excited and/or nervous before a busy day of patients, before a difficult race or training session, watching my kids in sports, coaching their sports and plenty of other things.  To me, the fact I care enough to be like this is a blessing and makes life more worth living!

A supplement many of my patients use.  Turmeric is one of the strongest, natural anti-inflammatories available.  It can be added into food as a spice but has become very popular as a nutritional supplement. Because of its ability to decrease inflammatory processes, it is often taken for joint support, to help with arthritis, etc.  When I train for an ultramarathon, I take a joint support with a high dosage of turmeric and it always helps.  Turmeric is also a very potent antioxidant, so it helps your immune function and can prevent you from getting sick/recover quicker if you are.  There are different potencies for this supplement, and some are higher quality than others, but they are not expensive and can help tremendously.

Some quotes I love.

“My children didn’t just increase the love in my life, they increased my capacity for love in my life.” – Dave Chappelle

“Only through real acts of kindness, courage and love can we redeem the world.” – Brendon Burchard

“Obstacles don’t block the path.  They are the path.” – Zen Proverb

“Successful people do what unsuccessful people are not willing to do.” – Jeff Olson

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com and go to “blog”
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 14th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 7th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

A great reminder to me as a chiropractor.  Last week I started having some nasty upper back pain.  It began without any specific incident and quickly escalated from annoying to extremely painful.  I finished coaching football last Thursday night and began having severe muscle spasms which made things even more problematic.  I was able to fight through it and see patients the next day (and no one noticed I’m proud to say!) but it was annoying.

As a chiropractor, though I don’t love this I always feel it’s important to remember how so many of my patients are feeling when they come to see me…crappy.  Furthermore, it’s also good to be reminded that the healing process can take some time.  It took multiple treatments and diligent self-care before I was back to where I wanted to be.  Was I aggravated that it didn’t go away instantly like so many of my patients can be?  Of course, but my body didn’t care and needed time.  All in all, it was a good reminder that it’s no fun to be in pain, healing takes time, and the right natural treatments and self-care can be amazing for recovering even from some of our worst pain!

A simple lesson on accountability.  After a great 4-year reign, my beloved Garmin running watch finally died.  Aside from all the training runs and races, I relied on it for tracking my steps.  I always enjoyed competing with myself and seeing how active my days were (in 4 years I missed my step goal twice – once for an injury and once 100 steps short after I fell asleep the day my daughter was born!)  Anyway, I ordered a new watch, and it took a few days to arrive, so I went a couple days without tracking those steps.  I noticed in that time that I was less diligent about being on my feet and active as much.  I had an excuse and was holding myself less accountable than I normally would in that regard. 

This is a simple example, but the premise is crucial.  There will always be some reason to tell ourselves we can do a little less, decrease intensity, skip things, or lose focus.  When this happens occasionally it’s not a big deal.  However, it can be a slippery slope and long-formed, solid routines can quickly disappear.  I talk to patients every week that worked out for years who have then gone months or years before returning to exercise for example.  Don’t allow pointless excuses sidetrack you and prevent you from achieving your goals. 

Opportunity or excuse?  I’ve had several interactions this week that brought up a very distinct point that I find significant. In general, these are what they sounded like:

“I’ve gained a lot of weight because of COVID.”

“My schedule was less hectic, so I’ve gotten back into good shape during COVID.”

“I was scared about COVID, so I haven’t really done anything.”

“I was worried about COVID, so I wanted to start eating better, moving more and getting healthier.”

As I said, I’ve heard these types of statements many times – often about health or business.  The reason I find it significant is because it drives home the point that the exact same situation will be an opportunity to some and an excuse for others.  If you have the mindset that you will succeed no matter what, most situations are likely to present as opportunities for you.  Conversely, if you are the type to make excuses, most situations are likely to present to you as more reasons not to do something.  Things are not always ideal or easy and you may not be able to directly control every situation, but you can command how you react to it.

Are you consistent?  I heard an ex-NFL player giving advice to rookies the other day and he told them “be the same guy every day.”  He meant to bring the same work ethic, habits, etc. to work each day.  This resonated with me because one of my goals is to always be consistent – with my routine, in my temperament, how I treat people, etc.  Maintaining consistency has helped me in my personal relationships, as a father, athlete, business owner, coach and so much more.  Stay consistent and be the same person every day!

Some quotes I love.

“It’s no longer our job to awaken the sheep.  It’s time to awaken the other lions.” – Brian Warren

“If you just root for people and expect nothing in return you can’t lose!” – Jesse Itzler

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com and go to “blog”
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 7th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 30th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

Can you help with jaw pain?  Yes.  There are two main causes of jaw pain that I see.  First, the top vertebra in the neck is called the atlas and is oval-shaped.  When misaligned enough, it can interfere with the opening and closing of the temporomandibular joint located in front of it.  Second, sometimes the TMJ joint itself can be tracking improperly.  This indicates that the jaw itself is misaligned. 

Of these two, I would say that about 70% of the time, the upper neck is the culprit and 30% it’s both.  There can certainly be more severe issues with the jaw but most cases I see are able to be fixed by adjusting one or both areas (sometimes incorporating muscle work and/or stretches as well).

A good reminder regarding symptoms.  Something important to remember about symptoms is that assessing your level of health based on presence or lack of symptoms can be very limiting.  For example, the first sign of heart disease for many is a ride in an ambulance.  Likewise, cancer does not give you immediate symptoms and often displays signs only after being present for some time.  Lack of symptoms does not necessarily indicate great health.

When symptoms are present, this does not mean you are unhealthy.  If you get food poisoning, you’ll probably have something coming out of both ends for a while which is not pleasant but is helping to correct an issue.  Pain is not fun, but your body is using it to give you information.  Symptoms are essentially messaging your body sends you indicating something is going on, just like a check engine light in your car would be.  It’s not always pleasant but it’s always valuable.  When assessing your own health try to remember that the absence or presence of symptoms is only a piece of the puzzle and need to be considered as such.

Something I enjoy.  The football team I coach is off to a tough start.  Last season we dominated and this season after moving up and age level, we’ve taken some lumps.  As a competitor and leader this is not my favorite place to be by any stretch but there is a good life lesson in this situation. 

Rather than whine about it, start pointing fingers or going in the tank; I have learned to enjoy the process of getting my team to improve.  I love trying to figure things out – what we do well, what we need to get better at, how to teach the players in a way they’ll understand more, maximizing our potential, how we can be unpredictable, where are our unique advantages, etc.  I use this same approach in business, life, and everything I do – I enjoy the grind of drilling down on anything and everything that can lead to success.

Something that I found interesting and valuable this week.  Someone I respect greatly got on the topic of opinions versus advice.  Everyone will have opinions and they can be based on biases, past experiences, ignorance, limited knowledge, or any number of other factors that need to be taken with a grain of salt.  Advice on the other hand, usually comes from experience.  As a parent, have you ever received advice from someone without children?  It doesn’t have anywhere near the effect it does when it comes from another parent who tells us what they’ve done in a certain, similar situations that we’ve faced.

This premise is valuable.  Opinions are a dime a dozen and can be found anyplace.  Turn on any news station and you’ll see plenty of them.  Conversely, when we look for advice, we are seeking to hear from those that have been there and done that.  Good advice gives us the opportunity to streamline efforts, avoid mistakes and reach intended outcomes faster.  Not everyone can give you this type of information so when you do find it, treat it like gold.  There is nothing wrong with giving or receiving an opinion, it’s just not the same thing as advice.

Some quotes I love.

“Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure.  Life is either a daring adventure, or nothing.” – Hellen Keller

“Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat.” – F. Scott Fitzgerald

“Never accept an inferior position to anyone.  It is the strongest spirit that wins, not the most expensive sword.” – Miyamoto Musashi

“Your calendar and your bank account will show you what you truly value.” – Ryan Michler

“If you knew how quickly people forget the dead…you would stop living to impress people.” – Christopher Walken

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com and go to “blog”
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 30th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 23rd

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

Something I’ve been eating and enjoying.  Lately I’ve been eating a lot of “power bowls” that my wife introduced me to.  The ingredients in these can vary but I start with a base of brown rice.  Into that I add sauteed kale, white beans, sun dried tomatoes, chopped walnuts and feta cheese.  You could make them with different types of proteins, lentils, couscous, and various other ingredients, but the one I described above has been my favorite.  It fills me up, feels “clean” to my system and gives me a ton of prolonged energy!

A workout I’ve been doing and liking.  I am always looking to change up my workouts in some way.  One of the methods I use to do so is often to do a workout that is focused on volume – meaning more sets and/or repetitions.  For my legs, I’ve done this for a change over the past 2 weeks.  The first workout is what I call the “500” – I select 5 separate squat exercises and perform 20 repetitions of each before moving without rest to the next exercise.  One time through each of the 5 exercises is 100 total reps and I will do 5 sets for a total of 500 reps. 

The exercises I chose were a regular squat, jump squat, hack squat, thrusters and goblet squats and the weights were on the lighter side for me because I was doing higher reps.  At my next workout, I selected a moderate weight and did 10 reps for each exercise (because it was heavier) for a total of 250 over the 5 sets.  These workouts were a solid challenge and something different, so I enjoyed them. 

Something my wife and I teach our children.  A saying (and lesson) that my wife taught me that she and I both continue to teach our children is that “courage is contagious.”  Courage can take on many forms and can be huge, bold actions or a simple, understated one.  What does not change though, is that when (most) people encounter someone being courageous, it inspires them.  They may join in right away or it may plant a seed for later.  I believe this truer now than ever in our current climate.  I’ve been motivated by the acts of children, elite military operators and regular people I’ve seen in stores.  Courage has no criteria for size, strength, or lifetime accomplishments.  You can show courage at any time and when you do, I assure you that someone will notice and carry it forward at some point!

What do I do when I’m not motivated?  I got this question from a nice guy earlier this week and I thought I’d mention it because it brings up a teachable point.  If I were to estimate how much motivation plays into my life, I would put it at about 10%.  That doesn’t mean I don’t love getting excited or pumped up but as a rule, motivation doesn’t take you very far. 

My routine (comprised of my habits) is 90% of the game for me.  By having a routine, things go on autopilot and I don’t worry about how I’m feeling, I just get things done.  This applies to my businesses, exercising, coaching, you name it.  For example, if you’re new to working out it may take a bit of motivation to get you started but having to get pumped up daily to do it would not be sustainable.  However, after you start doing it for a period of weeks or months, it’ll just become second nature and you’ll do it without debate.  Motivation can be a spark, but routine keeps the fire burning.

Some quotes I love.

“Success is never owned; it is rented, and the rent is due every day.”

“Hope is not a course of action.” 

“Worrying is like praying for what you don’t want.”

“Success is the sum of small efforts, repeated day in and day out.” – Robert Collier

“You can’t save people who aren’t willing to participate in the rescue.” – Ryan Michler

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com and go to “blog”
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 23rd
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 16th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

A great lesson I’ve learned from coaching.  I’m a high energy guy and when in a competitive setting I can be especially so.  A couple years ago, before my team played our main rival I was especially pumped before and during the game.  However, as the game went along, I noticed that certain guys kept complaining about little injuries and some were asking to sit out which was very abnormal.  What I came to realize was that by showing them how pumped up I was (far more than usual), I made the game seem too big for them.  Some were afraid to make mistakes and let me or their team down so they became gun-shy. 

This taught me a lesson about leadership.  While it’s certainly part of my job to make sure everyone is excited to play, it is also my duty to show them a calm resolve.  From that point forward, I have remained just as enthusiastic, but I pick my spots better.  I now make sure they see my excitement but also that I’m relaxed and believe in them.  Staying steady like this regardless of the stakes or situation has helped my coaching but is also a lesson that I believe translates well into any leadership situation.

A recent reminder of a good lesson.  The youth football league I have coached in for several years was recently bought out and taken over by new ownership.  They’ve made quite a few mistakes and it’s been frustrating for players, coaches, and parents alike.  I’m on an email thread with all the coaches and initially it started out with the sharing of constructive information but quickly broke down into a complaint-fest from a few.  I raise this point because it reinforced a belief of mine that complaining is ultimately a waste of time and energy. 

We’re all faced with things we don’t like.  No one is saying you must pretend to enjoy it but carrying on about what “should’ve been” will land you nowhere.  In this specific case, I chose not to voice my complaints though I did share the same frustrations.  Instead of griping, I made calls and wrote emails to people I knew could help, told them what I wanted and got it done.  Many other coaches did the same and like me, tired quickly of hearing others complain.  When you encounter some bad news or a tough situation give yourself some time to be angry/frustrated/etc., (I recommend about 30 minutes tops) but after that time is up, it’s time to start seeking out solutions and acting. 

Question of the week.  I had several conversations this past week about “inner voice” – in other words, how do you talk to yourself?  Are you positive, negative, etc.?  So, the question is, what does your inner voice sound like?  My inner voice tends to be overwhelmingly positive and constructive, but I am also very hard on myself as a form of motivation.  I’d say part of the time I’m Tony Robbins and part of the time I’m Rocky’s trainer, Mickey.  One thing I always avoid is putting myself down.  So, what does your self-talk sound like?  If it were a movie, who would you get to play that role (or roles)?  I think it’s a fun but important question.

A concept I believe works.  I took golf lessons many years ago and believe me, I had a lot to correct.  The problem was, when I’d go to play golf after my lessons my mind would be over-loaded thinking about 5-10 things I’d been trying to improve.  As a result, I started to get (even) worse.   When I explained this to my instructor, he told me to pick one thing per round to work on.  It didn’t matter what it was, only that it was only a single thing.  The reasoning behind this is to keep my mind focused and the task manageable. 

I believe this same thing is great advice for anything and everything in life as well.  The next time you find yourself frazzled with too much to do, try to keep focused on a single task, get it done and then move onto to the next.  When you keep it simple and manageable your productivity and performance will improve.

Some quotes I love.

“An individualist says: I will not run anyone’s life, nor let anyone run mine.  I will not rule nor be ruled.  I will not be a master nor a slave.” – Ayn Rand

“Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.” – Thomas Edison

“Everyone must choose one of two pains.  The pain of discipline or the pain of regret.  Discipline weighs ounces, regret weighs tons.”

“Treat energy the same way you treat money.  It’s a finite resource that needs to be wisely managed and invested.” – Dandapani

“If you’re not helping to make it right, then stop complaining about it being wrong.” – Joe De Sena

“Regardless of the overwhelming odds or obstacles in your path, you always have an opportunity to overcome.  It is your attitude that will determine the outcome.” – Jason Redman

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com and go to “blog”
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 16th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 9th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

An analogy I think works.  As parents we teach our children to respect their things.  Treat your things with care so they don’t break or get lost.  It’s simple but important – if you take care of it, it’ll remain in good condition and last a long time.  As simple as this lesson is, as a doctor I see people each day that don’t follow this principle with their own bodies or health.  We should put far more emphasis on caring for ourselves than we do on protecting inanimate objects.  Not caring for our possessions can cost us money and aggravation but ignoring our bodies and health will cost far more in the long term.  Ultimately, the best advice is to treat your own body like you care about it!

An exercise mistake I see often.  As someone that has been working out since my teens, a former trainer and now a chiropractor; I see horrible form on leg exercises all the time.  Most commonly, I see people overloading their knees on squats and/or lunges very often. 

The way to tell if you’re doing this is to glance down at your knees – if they are forward of your toes on a squat or lunge then your form is not good.  The reason this usually happens is that people tend to put too much pressure into their toes and front part of their feet which brings the knees forward.  Instead, keep the weight toward the mid and back portion of the feet which will take pressure off and make it less likely you’ll start leaning forward and loading pressure onto the knees.  I had a patient a couple months ago that mentioned knee pain during a couple of visits and then mentioned that he squatted every day.  I asked him to demonstrate his form and it was a mess.  I corrected that form with him, and the knee pain quickly went away.

A concept I believe in.  A couple nights ago I was reading a book and relaxing on the couch as my son played with his superheroes.  After a bit he came over and wanted me to play with him.  I was tired and it was getting late (for me anyway!) and I almost told him to just go ahead and keep playing on his own.  Instead, I put down the book and we played for about 30 minutes with his toys.  He was extremely happy, and it was a simple yet great time for me as well. 

This is an example of something I like to call an “effort moment.”  These are times when we have plenty of justification for just being done but decide to go a little further.  I’ve found this effective with my care of patients, during exercise, while running races and in personal life in situations like I just described.  You just give a little bit more at the times when you feel least like doing so.  The best part is that those few extra minutes of effort and dedication almost always produce some of the best moments and memories.

Question of the week.  I’m not sure where I stumbled across this, but I saw somewhere recently the question of “what is your brand?”  Meaning, if you were to ask all the people you interact with most, what would they say you are known for?  Your personal brand will encompass how you treat others, the things people know are important to you, your values, habits and more.  As a personal exercise, ask yourself what you think your brand is.  If you’re happy with the answer, keep going.  If not, start making a few changes.  No brand will be (or should be) universally loved but you want to be proud of the one you’re putting forth!

Some quotes I love.

“Be careful in assuming anyone who praises you is your friend and anyone who criticizes you is your enemy.” – Ryan Michler

“We first make our habits, and then our habits make us.” – John Dryden

“A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.” – Albert Einstein

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com and go to “blog”
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 9th
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