All posts tagged: littleton chiropractor

Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – November 12th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

Something I believe.  I graduated in the top five of my chiropractic class.  Among my classmates I was one of the best adjusters and most clinically proficient.  When I left school, I did so with the highest level of skill I could have attained.  I mention this because when I think back to my earliest years in practice, I realize I knew nothing compared to what I know today.

This is an example of something I believe strongly in, that you can only truly learn and grow by doing.  When you are new at something, you will make mistakes but through them you will learn.  You can only understand how to run a business when you have one, you won’t know much about caring for a child until you have one of your own, and so on.  Do not be afraid to begin because once you are underway, you will begin acquiring experience through which you will acquire the most significant knowledge of all.

Something I try to do during each workout.  I believe that constantly challenging your limits is crucial to growth.  That includes physical, mental, performance, and more.  To help facilitate this, I make it a point during every workout I do to push my limit at least once. 

For example, when I run, I will often sprint up the hills.  This gets me breathing heavy and gets me accustomed to continuing after being tired.  Other times I will add on an extra mile or two, to prove to myself that I always have more in the tank.  When I do weight workouts, I’ll add in something extremely challenging at the end of the workout to get me used to pushing when I’m fatigued.  The next time you work out, find a way to challenge yourself in a significant way even for just a moment; over time it will produce amazing growth and progress!

A concept I love.  I have a series of important things that I feel must be prioritized each day.  For me, these include quality time with family, exercise, productive contributions to my businesses, prayer, planning, time with my own thoughts, and more.  Cumulatively, I consider this my “rent.”

I consider this “rent” due each day and I must do the things I mentioned to pay the rent.  If I fail to pay the rent each day, I will fall behind – physically, mentally, with my family, etcetera.  Therefore, I do not allow that to happen.  This week, give thought to what you would consider to be your “rent” and then decide whether you’re paid up or behind.

A supplement you should be taking.  Exposure to sunlight is the easiest way for our bodies to produce vitamin D.  As the weather turns colder and the sun sets earlier in the fall and winter months, we get less of it.  This may not seem significant until you consider what a lack of Vitamin D can lead to – decreased immune function, osteoporosis, certain cancers, heart disease, depression, brain issues, diabetes, and more. 

I recommend taking a vitamin D3 supplement at least during the fall and winter so that you avoid having low levels.  D3 supplements are not expensive and can be taken via capsules or drops (I use drops and usually use the Sprouts brand).  I promise you, if you do a quick search of the problems linked to Vitamin D deficiency, you will want to start supplementing immediately.

Some quotes I love.

“People won’t bat an eye at buying a $1,000 phone but will think twice before investing $100 into themselves.” – Joe De Sena

“A great man is hard on himself; a small man is hard on others.” – Confucius

“Be afraid of the calmest person in the room.” – Bruce Lee

“If you want to achieve greatness, stop asking for permission.” – Zig Ziglar

“All the knowledge in the world is useless without action.”

“Finish each day and be done with it.  You have done what you could.  Some blunders and absurdities no doubt crept in; forget them as soon as you can.  Tomorrow is a new day.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

“If you don’t fight for what you want, don’t cry for what you’ve lost.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – November 12th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – November 5th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

A concept I believe in.  One of my best friends from Boston and I used to go to a lot of restaurants and large family events together.  Something he would often tell me, was the person preparing the food either preparing it either did or did not put love into the food.  For example, we’d go to his grandmother’s house, and he’d tell me “You’re going to love this, she puts a lot a lot of love in her food.”  Other times we’d be going or have left a place and he’d say, “there’s no love in that food.” 

What he meant by this, the best food comes from the best effort.  When you care, you do all you can to make something great.  When you don’t, you cut corners and say, “well that’s good enough.”  This premise applies not only to food but to anything and everything you can imagine.  When I adjust a patient, I make sure to clearly focus on the outcome both the patient and I desire while giving the best adjustment and care possible.  This is how I put love into what I do.  Whatever you’re doing, if it is something you want to turn out great, put love into it!

An excellent life lesson I’ve learned through my races.  Competing in the long, grueling events that I do; it can often get lonely and painful.  One of the things I have trained myself to do when things are going south is to smile and look around at the scenery.  As simple as this is, it gets me out of my own head and reminds me that there is more going on than just my footsteps and mileage.

I use this same premise in my personal life.  For example, if something has stressed me out or I have a lot on my mind, I focus on being present with my family.  I try to make them laugh, enjoy watching how they interact with one another, etc.  Just like in the races, this takes me out of my own head and reminds me of the bigger picture. 

An example of something I often teach my patients.  Last Thursday, I went for a run in the morning and felt great doing so.  A few hours later, I could barely put any pressure onto the inside portion of my foot.  I tried working on the muscles and did a session of cryotherapy which helped but it hurt to walk.  Based on where the pain was and how it came about, I thought there might be a structural issue causing it.  I had my 15-year-old son (who is strong) pull my big toe in a few different directions and eventually it went back into place.  Instantly, I felt 100% better and could put full pressure on the foot without pain.

Patients often come to me with severe pain expecting something severe to be going on with their body.  It feels horrible so they assume the worst. However, many times it is a simple thing causing the symptoms and it can be resolved quickly with the right care.  In terms of the spine, a misalignment may dramatically irritate a nerve and cause severe pain but can be easy to correct with an adjustment.  In my case, my big toe was jammed causing my foot muscles to contract and over-compensate to the point I could barely stand on it.  Putting the toe back allowed everything to function normally again and I went from barely walking to 100% improvement instantly.  The take home point is that the severity of what you’re feeling does not always indicate the complexity of the actual problem.

Something I heard that resonated with me.  I came across a random video clip on either Instagram or YouTube last week about self-talk.  The person in the video said that for years he would talk to himself in a very negative way.  He’d call himself stupid, weak, dumb, whatever.  Then one day, he had the thought if he talked to his friends in that fashion, he’d have no friends.  From that point forward, he started talking to himself as he would his friends.

I thought this was a valuable lesson.  If we can’t learn to talk positively to ourselves, how can we expect that from those around us?  For much of my life, I talked to myself far worse than anyone else did.  If your best friend struggled in something you wouldn’t tell them “You failed because you always fail and you’re a loser,” you’d be constructive and help them through it.  Take that same principle and apply it to your own self-talk and you will surprised how much better things start to go.

Some quotes I love.

“You can beat 50 percent of your competition by consistently showing up and working hard.  You can beat the next 40 percent by doing things with urgency and detail.  The last 10 percent…is simply a dogfight.”

“The forest was shrinking, but the trees kept voting for the Axe, for the Axe was clever and convinced the Trees that because his handle was made of wood, he was one of them.” – Turkish proverb

“Always take sides.  Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim.  Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.” – Elie Wiesel

“Civilized men are more discourteous than savages because they know they can be impolite without having their skulls split, as a general thing.” – Robert E. Howard

“You are always one decision away from a totally different life.”

“The one who plants trees knowing that he will never sit in their shade, has at least started to understand the meaning of life.” – Rabindranath

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – November 5th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – October 29th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

A leadership mistake I see often.  Leaders such as employers or coaches are responsible for putting forth a plan of action to generate results.  A common mistake I see is a lack of leadership to adjust course based on results or lack thereof.

Both of my sons play on different tackle football teams.  On one, I see the coach making weekly adjustments based on results, personnel, and the next opponent.  This team has performed amazingly well due to good leadership.  My other son plays on a team that makes no adjustments.  They’ve done the same thing week in and week out and the results are never great.  They make no changes, and it baffles everyone from players to parents to opponents.  When it doesn’t work, the coach falls back on platitudes and excuses and absorbs no responsibility.  He says “well it should be working” though it never has.

A great leader must be fluid and make changes, as necessary.  Leadership is not a one-time event but a continuous process.  It may involve addressing weaker links, course correcting or even completely changing course.  I like to believe the best leaders are navigators, always evaluating where they are and where they want to end up.

A great lesson.  A couple of years ago I was about twenty miles into my first 100-mile race when I came upon another runner.  He began talking to me and we ended up chatting for a bit.  He talked to me about how tough the race was, mentioned previous races he hadn’t finished, and started making excuses for why he hadn’t trained harder.  I mostly listened, said little and just kept running.

After a mile or so of this, I could tell it was giving him comfort to have this conversation with me.  What did I do?  I sprinted away from him as he spoke.  I didn’t care how tired I was or how socially awkward it might be, I wanted that man away from me.  I could tell by his negative self-talk and excuses that he was going to quit, and that is a cancer.  I did whatever I could to get myself away from him because I didn’t want any of that negativity getting near me.  Sure enough, we both arrived at the next aid station around the same time and as I continued through it, I turned back and saw him leaving the course.  He had quit just as I knew he would.  Do whatever you can or must to remove negativity from your life because it will weigh you down like an anchor and impede your goals.

Rules I follow in coaching and life.  I got into a conversation the other day about coaching.  I shared with them the four rules I follow and believe they are just as effective in business and life as they are for sports.

First, I never make coaching personal.  Insulting or making fun of someone is uncalled for and only ruins morale, so I refuse to do it. 

Second, I focus on coaching skills rather than just outcomes.  If someone misses a tackle, yelling and screaming at them isn’t helpful.   Instead, I may help them with footwork or body position so that they can make the next tackle.

Third, I try to find something (even small) a player does well and build their confidence even more for that skill.  Once they feel confidence in one area, my experience is that they are more comfortable learning other skills. 

Finally, I am not afraid to yell and get in someone’s face if they are putting in a poor effort either physically or mentally.  Regardless of ability, these two variables are always under our control and there is no excuse for not putting forth a maximum effort. 

An important piece of exercise advice.  As a former trainer and doctor for over 16 years, I’ve had thousands of conversations about working out.  One of the more common mistakes I see is performing the same type of exercise in the exact same manner each time.  For example, someone may go to the gym and do the same exercises in the same order, using the same weight, and for the same number of repetitions for every workout.  The problem with this is your body likes to be as efficient as possible.  Thus, when you do the same things in the same manner over and over, your body has no reason to get stronger, build endurance or lose weight.

My advice is to avoid doing the same workout twice in a row.  This does not mean you must completely change everything, but I would encourage you to vary things.  For example, you could do the same exercises but change the order.  You could go up in weight but down in reps or you might want to do less rest in between sets.  If you’re out running, walking, or cycling; you can try and go faster over shorter distances and then try a day where you go longer and slow.  What you change is up to you, but when you keep it fresh, your body will react with far better results.

Some quotes I love.

“Agreeable men leave no legacy and watch from the sidelines as the world is shaped without their input.  Being a yes-man and an obedient boy is a pathetic existence.  Allowing your bloodline to grow weak and quiet is an insult to your forefathers.” – Ian Smith

“The right attitude very rarely leads to the wrong action.” – Tom Ziglar

“You must make a choice to take a chance or your life will never change.”

“Set a goal.  Make a plan.  Stay focused.  Work hard.  Succeed.  Stay Humble.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – October 29th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – October 22nd

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

A common nutritional mistake.  I got into a conversation with a patient who began working out a month ago and is frustrated that she hasn’t lost a pound.  She has been eating better and when I asked about her nutrition it didn’t sound bad.  However, when I asked about what she’d been drinking she told me she just drinks sweet tea all day.

Liquid calories are a common pitfall for many in the quest to become healthier/lose weight/etc.  Soda, juices, alcohol and more have considerable amounts of calories from sugar do little help to your body.  They can do quite a bit of damage such as weight gain and insulin sensitivity.  It is also extremely easy to consume many calories that you may not want or are not aware of in a brief period.  Drink water as much as possible and consume the sugary beverages occasionally.

Something I believe.  Though we often say we often say we want things to be easy, things are not always going to be easy.  If something that is too easy or handed to us, we have no appreciation for it.  In sports for example, beating a great opponent is much more gratifying than destroying an inferior one. 

When things are not easy, the great ones among us will raise our game.  We will problem solve better, become more creative, work harder, work smarter, and try and find better ways of doing things.  Success may not come instantly but succeeding when things are hard will create immense pride, satisfaction, and fulfillment; all of which will make us better people.    We don’t need to wish hardships onto ourselves but should accept the fact most things in life worth attaining will never be easy, are not meant to be easy, and should never be easy.

A workout I loved.  The other day my 12-year-old son and I did a “hill repeat” workout.  We went to a hill that was about fifty feet up and steep and we would sprint up, walk down, then sprint up again.  We did this fifteen times, and it was an intense workout.  I enjoyed the workout itself but particularly enjoyed it because of what I saw in my son.

First, it made me incredibly happy to be reminded that he is someone that can get through challenges without complaining or giving up.  Next, once we finished the workout, he was extremely energetic and obviously proud of himself, which was an additional reminder that he values working hard and the feeling that it gives him.  Finally, as hard as the workout was, he didn’t see it as anything unexpected.  This tells me that he expects challenge and welcomes it.  These are all traits I have come to find vital in my own life and I’m thrilled when I see them in young people (especially my own!), because it took me many years and mistakes to learn them myself!

Reminder of an important lesson.  For about 6 years I’d been using a company for fax services.  It’s not a huge need for my business so I’d pay a small monthly fee to meet my needs in this area and it went fine for 6 years.  Recently however, I began to see over-charges, additional fees, and other changes that I’d never seen previously.  I called to inquire about this and with no warning to their customers, they drastically changed their pricing structure.  My cost was 5 times what it had been though nothing on my end had changed.  I called and canceled and refused their offers to “improve my service” with reduced pricing.

The reason I did not want to stay with them wasn’t about the money.  Trust is a sacred thing, whether it’s in a business or personal relationship.  Trust built over years can disappear in seconds.  In this instance, I had built a trust of the company over 6 years and once that was broken I would never feel comfortable dealing with them again.  No one is perfect, but we should always strive to behave in a way that builds rather than shatters trust. 

Some quotes I love.

“A mistake that makes you humble is better than an achievement that makes you arrogant.”

“The twin killers of success are impatience and greed.” – Jim Rohn

“Doubting yourself is normal.  Letting it stop you is a choice.”

“A hard beginning maketh a good ending.” – John Heywood

“Our country was founded by rebels who risked their livelihoods in pursuit of freedom.” – CJ Pearson

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – October 22nd
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 24th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

A technique I often use.  Have you ever gone out with friends and eaten a ton of food or had a bunch of drinks you know you really shouldn’t?  Ever skipped a morning workout to sleep in?  Have you given in to your anger and completely lost it on someone when you knew it was a bad idea?  These are all examples of letting our emotions grow in the moment and making a choice we’ll later regret.  It happens to all of us.

One of the techniques I like to use in situations like this, is to avoid focusing on how I’d feel doing something in the moment, and instead try and think about how I’d feel later.  For example, would it taste great to eat a bunch of unhealthy food right now?  Sure, but imagining how gross I’ll feel after the fact, keeps me stronger in the moment so I make the appropriate choice.  The key is imagining the feelings you’d have later as opposed to the ones you’d have in the short term.  If you’ll feel great about it later, then go for it.  If not, make a different choice.

Something I saw and loved.  I watched a football biography over the weekend and the coach talked about focusing on the process more so than the result.  His feeling was that if the process is diligent and sound, the results will take care of themselves.  The process involves a host of factors including planning, practice, repetition and more.

This appealed to me, and I have found this to be true athletically, personally and in business.  We are all after a certain goal or result.  Without a path to get there however, this is nothing more than a dream.  A solid process gives our goal a road map to eventual success.  It allows us to prioritize all the steps along the way and to pay attention to all the important details.  As an example, I’ve been around many business owners throughout the years.  Those that I speak to that talk to me about their processes they have within their businesses always make money as a by-product of them.  The owners that I speak to that lack good processes never make the money they expect to.

A workout I use to challenge myself.  Normally when I work out there’s some form of a finish line in sight.  In other words, a certain number of repetitions on a set, miles on a run, etc.  When this is the case, it makes it easier on your mind as it knows how far left it must go.  To challenge my body and mind in a different way, I regularly do workouts I call “blind time.”

When I do these, I will pick some type of exercise such as hitting a heavy bag, squatting, sprinting, etc. and set a timer on my phone for a given amount of time (1 – 3 min usually) but not look at it.  The timer will beep when it’s done but since I can’t see it, I have no idea how much time remains.  This will play tricks on your mind as 1-3 minutes can feel like forever and your mind constantly tells you just to stop.   These workouts have helped me strengthen my perseverance throughout the years as it has gotten me accustomed to hanging in there for just a bit longer.  Done repeatedly, this can have profound effects!

Reminder of an important principle.  My middle son plays on a tackle football team.  The coach sends out emails constantly and talks at practice about how it’s never about the wins, it’s about the kids.  Last Saturday however, they had a big win against a challenging opponent and the first thing the coach said afterwards was “I know a lot of you didn’t play much but, it was that type of game where we had to play the best players.”  In other words, he did what he needed to win, even at the expense of some of the kids.  I am a highly competitive person and coach myself, so I get it, but the disconnect between what he constantly preaches versus the actions he put forth really struck me.

It is extremely easy to talk or think of ourselves in a certain way, usually in the best light possible.  However, people will judge us based on actions, not words.  When we talk one way and act differently, we lose credibility.  Conversely, when we act exactly as we say we will, people develop trust in us.  There is a saying I love that fits this lesson perfectly, “don’t talk about it, be about it.”

Some quotes I love.

“Our greatest weakness lies in giving up.  The most certain way to succeed is always to try just one more time.” – Thomas Edison

“Your own family will talk sh** about you when you’re in the process of breaking all their generational curses.  This ain’t for the weak.”’ – Denzel Washington

“Victims make excuses.  Leaders deliver results.” – Robin Sharma

“You always pass failure on the way to success.” – Mickey Rooney

“You can’t climb a smooth mountain.” – Zig Ziglar

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 24th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 17th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

Something I think about often.  Years ago, I read a book about running and the author told a story that has stuck with me from that day forward.  Frank Shorter was a gold medal, Olympic marathon runner in the 70’s.  The author of this book was with Frank as they watched a group of runners training.  One of the more talented runners slightly cut across a corner as he was completing a workout.  When Frank saw this, he said to the author “he’ll never be a champion, champions never cut corners.” 

Every single time I come around a corner on a run I think of this.  It also reinforces one of my beliefs which is “how you do anything is how you’ll do everything.”  In other words, if you take shortcuts, you will do so in all aspects of your life.  Conversely, when you give even the smallest tasks your full attention and effort, you are training yourself to do that in life.

Some thoughts on courage.  I got into an interesting talk about courage the other day with a patient of mine.  I liked what she had to say, and she enjoyed my thoughts and asked me to share them in my 5 Spot.

Most people think about showing courage as a very cinematic event – an act is performed; everyone cheers and it’s an instant lovefest.  It would be great if this were the case but it’s far more likely that when you show courage you will be going against what is accepted or common.  Therefore, you may be ridiculed, mocked, or disliked for what you’ve done because it challenges the actions or beliefs of those around you.  As a result, true courage is probably easier to spot after the fact when times or events have had time to unfold.  What is considered “wrong” today, is courage later. 

I believe everyone has the capacity to be courageous though it is found in short supply these days.  Courage does not need to come from anything elaborate or someone special.  It can be something simple and can be performed by any of us.  A great example of this would be Rosa Parks who decided she would not move when she was asked.  Displaying courage is crucial, make sure you are acting accordingly. 

A lesson I’ve learned from running that is crucial in life.  Logging as many miles as I have over the years, I can tell you that not every run is created equal.  Some days things progress effortlessly, others feel as if each mile takes forever.  On the tough days, I often experience a strong desire to simply stop running and rest.  Many times, I have given in and done just that.  What I notice on these days though, is once you stop, you begin to stop more frequently, you think you’re more tired than you are, you need more rest, etc. 

The lesson this has taught me, is to keep going when it gets tough.  If I do this, I find that powering through a challenging period gives me strength on the other side.  It changes my momentum and before I know it, I feel great.  It’s as if I needed to prove to my mind, that my body was stronger than it thought, and then it gives up telling me to stop.  The exact same run can have two completely different outcomes in performance simply by staying strong during a few tough minutes.  Life is the same – if you don’t want to have to start over, than don’t stop – you’ll get stronger, and your results will be better!

A type of person to limit in your life.  There is a type of person that I often refer to as a “time hog.”  The hallmark signs of such a person are negativity, constantly talking only about themselves, no respect for your time, and no desire to learn or ask about you.  Most often, it’s as if these types of people will have 20 minutes worth of material they want to get out.  They will do so whether you’re interested or not and regardless of whether it’s a convenient time for you.  Most people that are time hogs may not even know they are, they have just become trained to act in that fashion and don’t realize how they are perceived.

Most of us have a desire to be nice, kind and caring so it can become challenging to deal with such a person.  My advice is to do whatever you must to limit your exposure to such people.  Not because they are bad people, simply because they will drain your energy and so much of your time.  I know people like this (patients and people in my life), and I am always polite but if you were to rewind our interaction and watch it, you’d notice I got away (escaped!) quickly.  Try not to be a “time hog” and certainly do your best to avoid them.

Some quotes I love.

“The freedoms you surrender today are the freedoms your grandchildren will never know existed.”

“Obsessed is just a word the lazy use to describe the dedicated.” – Russel Warren

“People will summarize your life in once sentence – pick it now.” – John C. Maxwell

“Life will only change when you become more committed to your dreams rather than your comfort zone.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 17th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 3rd

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

A good reminder.  On Sunday, I had to put down my beloved dog that I rescued 9 years ago.  He had a neurological condition that had been progressively worsening and last Thursday when I carried him outside to go to the bathroom, instead of wanting to come back inside quickly like always, he crawled under the shade of a tree and wanted to stay outside.  I felt as though this was a message directly to me telling me that it was “time.”

Ultimately, I had to make the call to put him down and it was a reminder to me of how sometimes being a leader is about making the calls you don’t want to.  In this instance, I needed to consider what was best for him rather than what would be better or less challenging for myself.  When people look to you as a leader, you will eventually be forced to make difficult, unpopular and/or agonizing decisions.  Ultimately, leaders would rather make those decisions than trust someone else to do it for them.

How I handle grief.  Saturday was the anniversary of my brother in law’s (and best friend) death last year.  Then Sunday I had to put my dog down.  Both events were incredibly sad and made even more so when seeing my family upset.  So, what did I do to handle it?

First, I make sure to get back into a routine.  After difficulties in life, we tend to drift away from our good habits.  We eat poorly, stop exercising, lose touch with friends, etc.  On Saturday, I did the “Murph” workout in honor of my brother-in-law and on Sunday and Monday I made sure to go for runs and exercise.  Did I feel like doing this?  No.  However, the exertion did help alleviate a lot of stress and tension and helped me cope with everything easier.  Next, I let my emotions go.  I am typically not someone that cries from sadness, but I did quite a bit of it on Sunday and Monday.  It’s far better to let all of that out and allow your body that release.  When you are hit with a tough time, don’t be afraid to be emotional but make sure you don’t allow yourself to fall into bad patterns.

Something I loved.  On Saturday, my oldest son had his first freshman football game and played all but about 10 total plays.  He was doing everything except working the concession stand and was understandably exhausted after the game.  One of his teammates and good friends did not get an opportunity to play much and texted him 2 hours after the game asking if he wanted to go to a field and practice.

It was 30 minutes away and my son asked if I would take him.  He commented that it was probably the last thing I felt like doing but I said I would.  The reason I was happy to do so was because I thought it was admirable for both boys to want to go back and get better.  My son could have easily said no to his friend because he was tired and played a lot but chose not to.  His friend could have sat at home and complained that he didn’t get playing time but instead decided to work on getting better.  Anytime someone has the desire to work harder and improve their performance in anything, it should be encouraged.   

What are your thoughts on the things being imposed on kids due to COVID?  I’ve gotten this question often over the past couple of weeks.  Normally, I refrain from talking about COVID in my 5 Spots because it gets too exhausting and boring but when it comes to kids, I felt it was important to comment. 

My first thought is that when it comes to anything about your child’s health, I would encourage you to do your own research and know your stuff.  Do not listen to the news, me, your pediatrician, neighbors, family, teachers, or anyone else as your sole source of information.  Take nothing for granted and make the time to compare the narratives to the evidence, learn about contraindications, exercise common sense, and more.  Second, adults should not need, want, or expect any child to protect them or their health.  We have a duty to help them and should pursue only the avenues that do so.    

Some quotes I love.

“First, they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out—because I was not a socialist.  Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out— because I was not a trade unionist.  Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—because I was not a Jew.  Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.” – Martin Niemoller

“It’s common now to mistake defending someone’s right to say things, with agreeing with those things.  If you don’t support free speech for people you disagree with, you don’t support free speech.” – Ricky Gervais

“Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.” – Virginia Woolf

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 3rd
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 27th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

An analogy I like.  I listened to a podcast the other day and the guest compared the freedoms we enjoy in this country to a buffet.  I think this analogy works for a few reasons. 

First, just like a buffet, there will be some things that really appeal to you and others you won’t like.  Second, the ability for you to select what you do and do not want to eat is crucial.  Vegetarians wouldn’t want to be told to eat meat, while others may not want to touch vegetables, etc.  In either case, the point is, we shouldn’t limit choices based on someone else’s preferences.  Finally, if someone were monitoring the buffet and telling you what you should be eating and why, it would be a dangerous precedent.  Maybe the person telling you to eat the beef owns cattle.  Perhaps the person encouraging you to eat the desserts sells a weight loss drug that you might find useful after years of sugar.  The point is, if there are choices seemingly available to you but someone is there to make sure you only pick certain things, it’s not a buffet; it’s a prison cafeteria.  Shutting a buffet down when you see people making choices you would not isn’t cool, freedoms work the same way. 

Something I believe in.  I had a new patient last week that came in (while I had a chiropractic student shadowing me) and was incredibly forthright in what he told me.  He gave me information on how he was feeling but also was candid as to things he’d done wrong and what steps he’d taken to remedy those actions.

This was an example of something I believe in strongly – people that are honest, humble and want to change; have already won half the battle.  On the road to change, we are usually our own worst enemy.  We make excuses, we get embarrassed, and/or we blame people and circumstances for our shortcomings.  Those who take ownership over their actions, admit that they could use help and are willing to do what is necessary to get there; will always succeed. 

A good reminder.  My dog is an older boxer that is sadly near the end of his life.  One night this week I went to bed and after about an hour of sleep I heard him barking which he rarely does.  I came down to check on him to see what he needed.  I adjusted him and gave him a treat, but he was still not relaxing.  At this point, I understood that he was barking because he didn’t want to be alone downstairs and, in his condition, he was unable to come and find me.  I moved his bed next to the couch, petted him until he fell asleep and spent the night next to him.

This experience with my dog was a good reminder to me of a lesson in life.  Sometimes the best thing you can do for someone is to just simply be there for them – listen, hold their hand, give them a hug, show them kindness, etc.  We can’t solve every issue, even though we’d like to.  At times, the best we can do is just be there for someone, so they don’t feel alone.

A trick I have relied on many times.  Have you ever had to go to work (or somewhere else) after a fight with your spouse, getting bad news about something, or feeling like there is something you’d much rather be thinking about than work?  This happens to all of us at some point and can be difficult to deal with. 

What I have found effective over the years is compartmentalizing.  When I get to work, I know my patients need me to be on my game.  I must give them the courtesy of my full attention and provide the very care possible.  If I am distracted about something this cannot happen.  Therefore, if I have something on my mind, I tell myself it must go into “the box” and I compartmentalize by imaging putting my trouble into a steel box and locking it away.  It doesn’t mean I am ignoring the problem or not acknowledging its existence.  Rather, it is an act or prioritization – I make myself focus completely on the task at hand without worrying about anything else.  Once I have finished what I need to, I allow myself to reopen that box and deal with whatever I must.  Years ago, as my first marriage was falling apart, I had to do this on an almost daily basis to get through a workday.  Last year when my brother-in-law died, I also had to use this technique.  Your mind cannot be in two places at once so use “the box” to help you focus and prioritize better.

Some quotes I love.

“The further a society drifts from truth, the more it will hate those who speak it.” – George Orwell

“The dream is free, the hustle is sold separately.”

“What the superior man seeks is in himself; what the small man seeks is in others.” – Confucius

“Civil disobedience becomes a sacred duty when the state becomes lawless or corrupt.” – Mahatma Ghandi

“If you tell the truth, you don’t have to remember anything.” – Mark Twain

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 27th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 20th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

A concept I took from coaching that I apply to life.  Years ago, as I was beginning to coach, I happened to run across the saying “you are either coaching it or allowing it.”  Quite simply, this means that you are either encouraging a certain behavior or it is permeating because you have failed to address the problem.  If my players are not hustling, arguing, not following instructions, etc. then it is my fault either because I taught it to them or allowed it to continue. There are few situations that can’t be brought back to the simple question of “am I coaching this or allowing it?”

It is also excellent advice for everyday life.  If you are around negative people, then you taught them to be that way or failed to get away from them.  If you’re not meeting your goals and are unhappy, you either want it that way or are unwilling to do what it takes to get to a better place.  With everything you do, you are either manifesting something or letting it happen.

Something I do not like to hear and what I prefer to do instead.  “It’s really tough so I’m…”  I hear a version of this all the time, and it usually begins with a desired outcome or behavior and then is followed by an excuse taking the form of “but it’s hard.”  We’ve all done this, but the reality is that almost anything worth doing or achieving will be hard.  I’m yet to read the biography of someone that talks about how easy their life was on the way to success or triumph. 

Rather than spend time explaining and focusing on why something is so hard, deconstruct it for yourself.  What are the hurdles?  How can you overcome them?  What would be a solid first step to solving the issue?  I find that taking these simple steps changes something that seems too hard or overwhelming and feeds you confidence that you might just be able to succeed after all!

I concept I take from my athletic career and use regularly.  When I played football in high school and college, I learned the term “playing hurt.”  This doesn’t mean that you play through serious injuries but refers to getting out there when you aren’t at 100%.  Maybe you’re sore, slightly hobbled, feeling sick, unmotivated, don’t feel like being there, etc.  but you still go and play.

I have found this invaluable in life as well.  My job is to help my patients who are not feeling well.  As a result, I never miss work unless it’s for an event or vacation.  When my life has gone through turbulent times, haven’t felt well, have been in physical pain, you name it, I have still been there, and my patients never know because I refuse to show them, I’m not at full strength.  I use this in other aspects of life is well, but the point is, most of us are rarely at 100% and there will always be reasons to quit, skip, or avoid our responsibilities.  The best policy is to suit up and show up unless you absolutely cannot, and those instances are extremely rare!

A great practice to either begin or continue.  I am a huge proponent of alone time.  It is not because I want a break from my family or patients, merely because the time alone allows me the time to get myself properly primed for the world and situations around me.  Sometimes I take this alone time before anyone is awake, sometimes while running, other times just pulling weeds in my yard.  Regardless of how I go about it, I take some time to think through issues, prepare for things of importance and reflect on things I can improve.  Make sure you find some time for yourself in a day so that you can do the same!

Something I told my sons recently.  My oldest son is on the high school football team.  One of the players has a form of autism (this is my diagnosis based on what I’ve seen and know).  At a practice last week, he came up and began talking to me and my two younger sons.  He was very kind and polite and was especially nice to my 3-year-old.  I really found him to be a good kid.  From a distance, I noticed a few of the other players kind of mocking him and at their game the next day, they chanted his name but not in a way that I felt was meant to support him, but rather as if he were the butt of the joke.  I was mad and upset.  My son had no role in it (and was unaware it even happened because he was playing so much, plus he wouldn’t anyway) but I shared my feelings with him and his brother. 

I told him that anyone that would make fun of someone or mock someone like that was inherently insecure and weak themselves.  These are never the type of people you want around you because they are always the first to leave when any challenge arises and will follow the pack regardless of whether it is right or not.  Furthermore, I expressed my admiration for the young man who was willing to show up with no friends on the team and play an incredibly physical sport, all with a smile on his face.  That type of person is someone I want around because they are strong in the face of adversity and never abandon the people they care about.  Most of the toughest and most successful people I know would never take the time to put someone else down but will always take the time to lift someone else up.  Be that type of person.

Some quotes I love.

“I just told my wife “I’m sorry we have to raise children in these dystopian times.”  She recalled a quote she read just today: “Never feel sorry for raising dragon slayers in a time where there are actual dragons.”  – someone sent this to me, not sure where it’s from

“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance; it is the illusion of knowledge.” – Stephen Hawking

“When the whole world is running toward a cliff, he who is running in the opposite direction appears to have lost his mind.” – C.S. Lewis

“Nobody is coming to save you.  So, save yourself.” – Ray Care

“If you can’t win in an imperfect circumstance, you are not good enough to win it.  If everything has to be perfect, then you have to get better.” – Kyle Dake

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 20th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 13th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

Something I encounter often in practice.  When I meet with new patients, they often tell me how high their pain tolerance is but then follow up with how much pain medication (prescription and/or over the counter) they take daily.  I bring this up, to point out, that pain is a message that your body gives you that something is amiss.  Your body is prompting you to do some investigating, find the issue and figure out what it will take to correct.  Masking these signals with medication does not mean that you have a superhuman ability to endure pain, it means you are blocking those signals and the issue remains. 

Pain medication certainly has a place, but it is not meant (or designed) as a long-term solution.  A body that feels pain is simply transmitting a signal in the same way your car does when the check engine light comes on.  What you choose to do with that information is up to you but seeking to fix a problem will always be more effective than covering it up.

A concept I love.  There is a Navy SEAL I follow on social media that talked recently about “spot checks” – times when another person will look in on you and make sure you’re living up to your potential.  He used an example of a friend texting, saying he was in town and asking if he wanted to go on a long run together.  This was a “spot check” of sorts to see if he was still staying in shape.

I love this concept not because I have people showing up at my door and looking to race me, but I like the overall premise which is to always be living my brand.  When someone sees me at a restaurant, I will be eating healthy, neighbors will see me leaving my house to go run, my kids will see and hear me working out in my yard or garage, I will always give each individual patient the best treatment I possibly can on each visit, etc.  I want to behave as though at any second if someone were to show up and “spot check” my behavior, they would have proof that I am living by example!

A trait I often find that is missing.  I notice more and more that the difference in levels of success has far less to with talent or circumstances than intensity.  I see this among business owners, athletes, you name it.  Let’s use business as our example.  Person 1 sends out emails, does mailings, performs the basics of what they think should build business and sees little or no return. They tell anyone who will listen how much they’ve done and cry the blues that nothing has come back to them.  These people are usually already on a countdown to quitting.

Person 2 does the same thing but with more intensity.  As a result, they adjust, try new things, and refuse to take no for an answer.  They spend no time complaining and work until they begin to see results at which point, they gain confidence in addition to their intensity.  If you’re not gaining the traction you want in each endeavor, take a hard look at the intensity you are (or are not) bringing forth.

An analogy I think works.  Have you ever had a car sit too long in a garage or in your driveway and when you go to start it back up the battery is dead?  It’s a bummer and could easily have been avoided by simply starting the car up at least a couple times per week. 

Your body is similar in this regard.  If it is not used, it will lose power and be much harder to get going when you decide you want to.  Rather than allow this to happen, make sure you’re keeping it regularly active.  This includes exercise of all types, walking, hiking, biking, and/or countless other options.  Choose whatever works best for you but remember that if you don’t use it, you will lose it so keep moving!

Some quotes I love.

“Imagine eating the exact same dinner every day because you only have the same ingredients.  The only hope is going out to procure different ingredients.  It’s the same with the trajectory of your life.  It’s made up of the ingredients you’ve had so far.  Want a different life?  Go get new ingredients.” – Kevin Miller

“If you run with the lame, you will develop a limp.” – Louie Simmons

“A wise man once said, ‘be careful who you let on your ship, because some people will sink the whole ship just because they can’t be the captain’.” – Tim Kennedy

“Freedom is not free.  Freedom comes with responsibility.  The responsibility that comes with having free speech and free access to information, you have to do your own research on both sides of any issue if you don’t want to be an idiot.” – Colion Noir

“Lions never forget who poked them through the cage.” – Ray Care

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 13th
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