All posts tagged: chiropractor

The beauty of comebacks – in races and in life!

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2,076.  Out of just over 2100 people, that’s where I was predicted to finish in my race by the “race predictor.”   For someone that is extremely competitive and has tackled some very challenging races throughout the years this was very humbling.

The race to which I’m referring is known as the Pikes Peak Ascent which is slightly more than a half marathon distance although more challenging than any marathon you’ll find. It begins at about 6,000 feet above sea level and after 13.3 miles and 8,000 feet of elevation gain over rocks and rough terrain eventually delivers you to the top of Pikes Peak, one of Colorado’s famous “14ers.”  I competed in this event for the first time last year and with 4 miles to go got altitude sickness – which both literally and figuratively made my race extremely ugly (here’s a LINK to my blog from last year about overcoming it – http://newbodychiro.com/2015/08/).  Based on that performance I was seeded 2,076 this year.

Since I crossed the finish line last year resembling something out of The Walking Dead, I’ve been anxious to attempt it again.  However, as the race grew closer it began to appeal to me for reasons other than just completing it again.  I saw this race as a metaphor for a specific time in my life.  A few years ago I moved across country with my family to a state where I knew no one and had to start over in my career.  Within months I was divorced, living in a small apartment, had little money and had to adjust to only seeing the loves of my life – my two young boys only 3-4 days per week.  As challenging as that was, I made the decision from the start to never complain, to never quit and always keep moving forward.  As difficult as things were, I saw it as an opportunity to reinvent myself.  Years later I am now a business owner, financially stable, have a nice home, am engaged to an amazing woman and have a closer relationship to my boys than ever before.   I transformed difficult times into a life far greater than I’d ever experienced.  In other words, I made a comeback.

As I lined up for the race in the 21st (and final) group of runners this past weekend I thought back to those times and embraced the strength it gave me.  Not only did it motivate me at race time but it made me train harder and smarter in the months and weeks leading up to that moment.  I was blessed because my failures motivated me, gave me passion and there I stood with an opportunity to earn a new outcome.  I even took it as a sign when the night before the race my 9 year old gave me his advice “Daddy keep reeling them in (passing other runners) and stay hungry!”  Those words were profound to me and exactly what I needed to hear.  Throughout the race I repeated them in my head hundreds of times and I did exactly as he told me.

In the end, the race was one I consider my best ever and of which I am the most proud.  I didn’t win; in fact I wasn’t even close (or even close to being close) to winning.  However, I came from dead last at the beginning and finished in the top 50%.  Just as my son told me, I reeled people in and stayed hungry for 4 hours and 43 minutes and finished 90 minutes faster than I did the previous year.  I gave every ounce of effort I could while embracing all the fatigue and challenge the race presented me.  As the elevation got higher and the miles got exponentially tougher I became even more determined to prove to myself what I could achieve.  It was very similar to how things had gone for me a few years back in my personal life – start from scratch, keep moving forward and eventually create a greater outcome.

One of the things I will always remember about the race is finishing the last ½ mile with a group of about 5 people.  The closer we got to the top the more emotional it became.  As I crossed the finish line the woman behind me grabbed my arm, smiled and while crying said “we did it!”  This was another reminder to me of how after we’ve endured pain or disappointment, how amazing it feels to attain a personal victory.  At the top of the mountain I had an hour to enjoy the amazing views and reflect.  I felt blessed to have experienced in that race what I had in life – the satisfying feeling of a great comeback!

Matt KenneyThe beauty of comebacks – in races and in life!
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7 Tips for facing adversity

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Over the last few days I’ve had conversations with several people going through difficult times.  Having gone through such times myself it got me thinking about the ways that were helpful for me in overcoming those times.  Today I’d like to share some of my favorite tips when facing adversity.

  1. Don’t be negative. Talking negatively too often and/or dwelling on the past is ultimately not constructive and has the damaging consequence of slowing (or preventing) our potential for solutions.  Worse, it can also become a destructive habit over time.  Rather than focusing on negative things, seek out the positive.  Direct your energy toward your positive traits, previous successes and the things you DO have in your favor.  This mindset will fuel you toward greater outcomes instead of hindering your progress.
  2. Get out of yourself. Something I’ve found extremely helpful during hard times is helping other people.  This helps get us out of own heads while providing a better perspective on our lives and problems.  Nothing will help you feel better about yourself than helping someone else.
  3. Suit up and show up. There will be rough patches in life for all of us – personally, financially, etc.  When we encounter these challenges there may be a temptation to quit taking the steps necessary to improve our situation.  You may not feel like getting up many days, may avoid the work you know you should be doing, you may cancel and not show up, etc.  I believe that for things to improve you must continue battling every day – even the days when you absolutely do not want to.  Your situation can be dramatically improved simply by continuing to push on; you never know when your break will come.
  4. Read the signs. Whenever I am faced with adversity I focus on even the tiniest signs of positivity that I can.  When I faced my most difficult times in life I was never handed immediate solutions.  However, I took note of small signals that helped motivate me to move forward.  As an example, I can remember during a particularly stressful time in my life watching a show that had a powerful scene in it.  I downloaded a song that played during that scene and listened to it constantly.  It didn’t solve my problems but it kept me hungry and motivated to keep pressing on.  These small signals on their own may not end your difficulties but they can be used as fuel for moving forward.
  5. Change is a process. No one ever magically wakes up one day with everything completely as they want; it takes time for things to manifest and improve.  My life over the past several years transformed into something far greater than I’ve ever experienced.  What’s interesting to me about this time period is that none of it happened over night.  In fact it was a series of wins seemingly spaced between an equal number of losses.  As you go through challenging times try and remember that change is not necessarily linear – there will be (many) ups and downs before you land where you want to be.
  6. Get some perspective. As human beings we immediately judge anything that happens to us as either good or bad.  However, in many cases it takes time for us to truly know which they were.  A person could lose their job today and be in a better job a year from now at which point they’d see losing the first job as a blessing.  When most of us look back at our toughest times few of us would change them.  It doesn’t mean they were a blast to go through but the strength, motivation and growth it provided almost always leads us to greater things afterwards.
  7. Get physical. One of the worst things a person can do when facing adversity is to neglect their body.  Doing so usually results in more stress and less motivation.  Eating better and making sure to get daily physical exercise of some kind is an excellent way to strengthen yourself to deal with any difficult time.  It will also help reduce stress and provide numerous physiological benefits.
Matt Kenney7 Tips for facing adversity
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8 Important lessons I teach my children

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In honor of Father’s Day this weekend I thought today I would like to share some of the lessons that I have found important in raising my two boys.

  1. Lead by example.  Saying one thing and then behaving in a way that contradicts those words confuses any message.  Above all else, I strive to show my boys through my actions what I truly believe.   Whether it’s exercise, how to treat people, how much time to spend on a handheld device, what to eat or any other example; I know my children will learn more from my actions than my words.
  2. Never give up. Whether physically or in times of trouble I talk continuously to my kids about never quitting.  In fact since they were old enough to talk I’ve asked them “when is a good time to quit?” and each time they respond “never!!”  My goal is to teach them that quitting on what you believe will never leave you at peace, in fact it will eat you up inside.  Conversely, persevering through challenges will lead to amazing achievements and greater self esteem.
  3. Respect your body. From a young age I believe it is important to teach children to enjoy taking care of themselves and that it is NOT a chore to do so.  My goal has always been to empower my kids with knowledge about things such as exercise and nutrition and then allow them to make good choices for themselves.  It is a great source of pride for me that they regularly seek out fun forms of exercise, healthy food (not always), chiropractic adjustments and other positive choices without any prompting from me.  This tells me that my boys see the benefits of those actions and want them for themselves.
  4. Challenge yourself. I talk to my boys regularly about the importance of seeking to achieve things outside of our comfort zones.  One of my favorite recent examples was my son asking to do a race.  His longest previous race was 3 miles so we signed him up for an 8 mile race – more than double what he’d ever done.  He successfully completed that race (through 9 inches of snow and 20 degree temps) and since then I’ve seen both his confidence and belief in what he can accomplish in the future grow.  Comfort zones can be physical and/or mental but breaking out of them is crucial to growth and achievement.
  5. Honor what you say. Throughout my business and personal life I’ve dealt with all sorts of people.  I often tell my boys stories of those I’ve encountered that do whatever necessary to honor their word and how that leads me to respect and trust them so much.  Conversely, I also tell them about people that lie, don’t stay true to their word or make excuses for poor behavior and how that affects a relationship.  I believe showing both sides motivates them to want to continue to behave with honor and integrity at all times.
  6. Put the work in. I try to teach my boys that what you put in is eventually what you get out.  Tough, consistent and smart work will ultimately help sharpen your skill set, increase your resolve and lead to better results.  This lesson is extremely important and applies to almost every (and any) aspect of life.  2 weeks ago after we’d played football at the park my boys designed a series of races for me where I had to carry one of them at a time while sprinting  or crawling with them on my back.  At one point I was bent over breathing heavily and remarked how tough it was.  My older son immediately said “well that’s why we do it daddy, it makes you better.”  Apparently, they understand this particular lesson.
  7. Stick with winners. A major component of how we grow and develop is the company we keep and the people we choose to look up to.  I make it a point to teach my boys to seek out positive role models and to learn from those that they respect and admire.  This helps foster self-confidence, happiness and personal growth.  By seeking out these types of people we create a healthy network of people while also avoiding the personality types that have the potential to bring us down.
  8. Laugh at yourself. I joke around with my boys a lot in fun and creative ways and they have no trouble returning the favor.   I am also not afraid to share embarrassing moments that I’ve experienced in my life with them.  Not only is this fun but it teaches them not to take themselves too seriously and to have a sense of humor about things.  I believe this creates self-esteem, prevents them from becoming hyper-sensitive, helps them relate to people better and makes it easier to laugh off certain mistakes when they occur.
Matt Kenney8 Important lessons I teach my children
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What makes a great chiropractor?

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Regardless of profession, there will always be things that help you to stand out within your field.  Chiropractic is no different.  Today I would like to share some things my patients tell me helps make the chiropractic experience in our office great.

  1. Being a good listener.  I was taught early in chiropractic school that if you take the time to listen, people will tell you exactly what is wrong with them.  I believe that the healing process begins when a patient starts to tell me their history.  I want each of my patients to feel heard and know that I care while giving me the information I need to begin helping them.
  2. Accurate diagnosis. Many chiropractors will begin treating a patient after performing no examination or testing.  Accurately diagnosing a patient’s condition is vitally important however.  Therefore, I perform a thorough initial evaluation and often (not always) x-rays to develop a very clear picture of what condition the patient has.  Arriving at a specific diagnosis avoids guesswork and allows me to get my patients better results much faster.
  3. Information.  My approach for educating my patients is simple – I want them to have a basic understanding for what is occurring with their body in order to empower them to help themselves when they’re not in my office.  As patients feel increasingly comfortable they may have more health questions and I enjoy sharing my experience and knowledge to answer those as well.
  4. Excellent technique. The quality and effectiveness of a chiropractic adjustment varies greatly from doctor to doctor (I get adjusted by many doctors and know this first hand).  I have a variety of techniques at my disposal but believe strongly in sticking to basics because they work.  I use proven, hands-on techniques that produce quick results over gadgets or fads.
  5. Individualized care. When I first got into practice I noticed that many chiropractors often handed out identical treatment programs to everyone and anyone.  Personally, I customize a plan for each patient based on the severity of their condition, their personal goals and overall level of health.
  6. Convenient.  Our office is designed with the convenience of our patients in mind.  Everything from our paperwork to same-day appointments to having our phones answered 24 hours a day is designed to make coming to our office a great experience.
  7. Experience with different conditions and case types. One of the things I take pride in is being able to help a very diverse group of patient types.  Specifically, I have extensive experience in pain relief, pediatrics, pregnancy care, working with athletes, dealing with all age types and helping those that have suffered traumatic injuries.
  8. Integrative.  In certain cases, chiropractic care alone may not be enough to correct a person’s condition.  I pride myself on knowing when to recommend things such as acupuncture, massage or rehabilitative exercise.  When necessary I also make referrals for additional testing such as MRIs or further evaluation with another type of doctor.  I always want my patients to feel confident that I will do whatever necessary to help them get well.
Matt KenneyWhat makes a great chiropractor?
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Skip the “resolutions”, try these instead…

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The time of New Year’s Resolutions is nearly upon us. Resolutions are often made but rarely kept, usually because there is no series of action steps in place to achieve them. More effective than resolutions are repeatable processes. Below are some of my favorites for creating a better you and a thus a better year.

1. Win your morning. A chaotic morning can lead to a disjointed day. To avoid this, start the day in control. Wake up at least 30 minutes earlier than normal, don’t use a snooze button and make your bed before leaving home. I’ve heard this recommended by many successful people and have found it effective myself.

2. Get started. People often waste days, weeks, months or even years waiting to begin something they know they should be doing. Ultimately this leads to wasted time, stress and unhappiness. Avoid “paralysis by analysis”, get started and you’ll begin seeing results.

3. Prioritize. The achievement of your goals is what ultimately matters, not being “busy.” Focus on the most vital tasks and activities before worrying about smaller, less important things. This will keep you focused, reduce stress and lead to greater accomplishments.

4. Try a new approach. Desiring a new outcome while utilizing methods that have been proven ineffective never works. Instead, alter your approach and habits. As you do so you will receive feedback that can be used to make better decisions and create more efficient processes going forward.

5. Feed your mind. Much like your body requires physical exertion; your mind likewise needs stimulation. Unlike the body however it is often neglected. Meditation, spending time around positive people, reading and learning new things are all examples of ways to stimulate your mind.

6. Spend more on experiences than “stuff.” A person only needs so many things. Usually the more we acquire the less we care about what we have. However, experiences stay with us and can change us for the better. Whenever possible put your money toward experiences.

7. Embrace discomfort. Whether physically or mentally, no one likes being uncomfortable and yet that is often where the most growth and success comes from. Personally I grew the most after a divorce and starting over on my own. Physically I grow the most after races where I’ve had to battle through pain, elements, hypothermia other trying conditions. If you can embrace discomfort you’ll find that things you once saw as difficult or impossible no longer are.

8. Move your body more. I believe everyone should be active in some fashion each day. Regardless of schedule, we can all commit at least 5-10 minutes to some form of exercise or physical activity. If you don’t want to go to a gym then find something to do in your home or outdoors. I have days that I perform strenuous gym workouts or runs but on days that I don’t I often hike with my family or do pushups and burpees for 10 minutes at home.

Dr. Kenney has won multiple awards for “Best Chiropractor” and specializes in helping patients achieve their goals of better health and pain relief. For more information please visit www.NewBodyChiro.com, find us on Facebook (New Body Chiropractic & Wellness Center) or call (303) 347-9906.

Matt KenneySkip the “resolutions”, try these instead…
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4 Things you should know about your posture

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As a chiropractor I assess people’s posture on a daily basis. In fact, I begin each examination with a basic postural evaluation. As I do this, I would estimate that 7 out of 10 people comment on how bad their posture is or has gotten. Today I’d like to discuss 4 crucial points I often share with my patients regarding posture.

1. Posture is your signal to the world – it tells a story about you whether you intend it to or not. Statistically speaking, when we meet someone we assess them within the first 90 seconds. Therefore, in most cases within a minute and a half we have made impressions of potential friends, clients or business colleague either positively or negatively. Poor posture can make us appear less approachable, not as confident, disinterested or create other unintentional negative signals that may not even be accurate. How confident do you think you appear as you deliver a presentation at work or as you approach that man/woman you’re interested in if your shoulders are hunched forward and your head is down? When you’re at a networking event and you’re slouching and leaning to one side do you think you’re appearing attentive and interested? The point is that your posture is telling a story every second that can either help or hurt you. Great posture will help better convey to the world your true self.

2. Certain aspects of our posture are completely under our own control. Sitting up straight, slouching less and or not having our heads forward staring into computer screens/mobile devices are examples of things we should do to improve posture. What I recommend for my patients positions are “postural checkpoints.” For example, if you find your posture is worst when you’re working on your computer try and train yourself to re-check your posture every 10-15 minutes. After a week or so it will become like second nature and you’ll notice that you’re no longer slouching or staring into your screen as you were previously.

3. Poor posture can lead to serious problems. Bad posture on a daily basis trains your body to remain in those poor positions. This places tremendous amounts of stress on your spine which in turn aggravates your nerves and causes pain and poor function. As an example, people with poor posture affecting their neck often end up with headaches or numbness and tingling into their arms or hands. Postural issues are much more than aesthetic; they can affect your neuro-musculoskeletal system in significant ways.

4. A chiropractor can help with posture. I always like to begin by giving my patients advice on improving their posture. For example, I may start by telling them to keep the breast bone up as this helps the neck, shoulders and hips naturally move into better positions. However, bad posture often comes from poor spinal alignment and/or a weak spine. In other words, the poor posture is a sign of an underlying spinal issue. For these patients I do a thorough postural and spinal check (including x-rays if necessary) in order to identify the problems causing the postural problems and then offer a plan to correct them. In my experience, even a single chiropractic visit often brings immediate and dramatic improvements to posture.

Dr. Kenney has won multiple awards for “Best Chiropractor” and specializes in helping patients achieve their goals of better health and pain relief. For more information please visit www.NewBodyChiro.com, find us on Facebook (New Body Chiropractic & Wellness Center) or call (303) 347-9906.

Matt Kenney4 Things you should know about your posture
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My 10 favorite exercise tips

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1. There is never a perfect time. Whenever I speak to people about exercise I always like to start with this. The longer you wait the tougher it is to get started. Begin today even if it’s just a little something to build your confidence and generate some momentum moving forward.

2. Pain and soreness are different. Soreness is an expected response after new or intense exercise and will subside usually within 1-3 days. Pain on the other hand is an abnormal response that can debilitate you in the short term and make you worse in the long term if you try to push through it. If you’re in pain visiting someone such as a chiropractor that can correct the problem is a good option.
3. Avoid stopping and starting. I speak to people regularly that get into a groove with exercise and then take weeks off at a time. The more you stop, the harder it is to start again and your progress will also suffer. Some weeks you may be able to do more than others but avoid the temptation to do nothing for extended periods of time.

4. Shake it up. Your body is an efficient machine. If you give it the same stimulus each time it has no reason to get stronger, faster or produce better results. For gym workouts vary your weights, workout order, exercises, rest between sets, etc. For cardiovascular training vary your distances, pace and terrain. Changing things up always produces better results.

5. Don’t get married to 1 type of exercise. Many people fall in love with a certain type of exercise they enjoy and ignore everything else. I know weightlifters that spend hours at the gym but forget that the heart is also a muscle and that cardiovascular exercise is important. Likewise, I know runners and cyclists that don’t understand that weight training would only make them more successful at those activities. Have a variety of exercise for better results.

6. Quality over quantity. There is a misconception that exercise must take hours at a time in order to produce results. This causes many people to avoid it altogether. The reality is that you can achieve excellent results in minimal time if you do it properly. I work out 4 days a week in the gym and my weight workouts usually only take me 20-25 minutes because I rest only minimally between sets (15-30 seconds) and never stop moving.

7. Intensity matters. While there’s no such thing as a bad workout, if you’re showing up to a gym and reading the newspaper for 5 minutes between sets your results aren’t going to amount to much. When you exercise focus on what you’re trying to accomplish and give it all your effort while you’re there.

8. Set a goal. People often set very generic goals such as weight loss or trying to have a better body. In my experience, the more broad the goal the less likely the chances of attaining it. What I encourage people to do is sign up for a race or an event. Doing so gives purpose to your training and motivates you to not show up out of shape. Even better, find an event out of your comfort zone and you’ll train harder and smarter than ever before. I’ve known far more people that have lost weight and built better bodies after signing up for 5Ks or mud runs than I have in making New Year’s resolutions.

9. Make it convenient. The best gym in the world won’t help you if you can’t make it there regularly. Select workout spots, types of exercise, etc that will make it the easiest for you to stay consistent.

10. Find someone that knows what they’re doing. I see people at the gym with great intentions that have no idea what they’re doing and are at risk for injuries as a result. Find a qualified trainer or someone with experience to show you some basics. This will give you confidence and lead to better and faster results.

Dr. Kenney has won multiple awards for “Best Chiropractor” and specializes in helping patients achieve their goals of better health and pain relief. For more information please visit www.NewBodyChiro.com, find us on Facebook (New Body Chiropractic & Wellness Center) or call (303) 347-9906.

Matt KenneyMy 10 favorite exercise tips
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7 Tips for dealing with tough times

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Difficult times will happen to us all. They can be emotional, physical, job-related, personal or take many other forms. Below are 7 strategies I’ve found effective for dealing with tough times of any kind.

1. Focus on solutions. Unfortunately life is not a linear curve of happiness and successes. There will be times when things will just not go right. Rather than dwelling too much on emotions, think about and focus on solutions.

2. Don’t quit. When facing difficult circumstance there is a temptation to quit or stop giving the same effort. Many great accomplishments are won by attrition – so refuse to stop showing up and giving all you have because you never know when things will suddenly turn in your favor.

3. Remember your why. Tough times are road blocks on the way to fulfilling goals – weight loss, happiness, promotions, sobriety, etc. To prevent yourself from quitting, never forget why you’re going after that goal. One of my most powerful “whys” are my children – as long as the goal involves helping them or being a better role model for them than nothing stops me.

4. Compartmentalize and prioritize. Tough times often involve the buildup of many things happening at once, leading to a daunting feeling of having too much to handle. I find it best to pick the most important task and give it all I have until it’s completed (if possible). During that time I give no thought to the other tasks on my plate because it will only distract my focus and efficiency.

5. Take a time out. When we’re facing difficult circumstances there is a tendency to carry negative feelings with us like baggage. In order to avoid having these feelings overwhelm us, it is important to have some place or some time to get away from them. For me, when I’m with my two sons I refuse to let outside stresses affect our time together. Secondly, I use long runs as a way to clear my head and get away for a while.

6. Focus on a reward. Sometimes the best way to get you through a tough time is to focus on some sort of prize at the end. This past weekend I ran a grueling 31 mile race and was in pain for much of it. To keep me moving forward I focused on how I would enjoy myself after the race – eating a certain food, going to see a movie I’d been dying to see and watching football and relaxing the next day. Rewarding yourself can make enduring tough times easier.

7. Get a new perspective. When we’re feeling overwhelmed our world can feel microscopic. This leads to a limited perspective and too much time in our own heads. I’ve found helpful to have someone I trust to act as a sounding board and then give me an objective opinion. More often than not, their honest feedback helps shift me back into a big picture focus.

Dr. Kenney has won multiple awards for “Best Chiropractor” and specializes in helping patients achieve their goals of better health and pain relief. For more information please visit www.NewBodyChiro.com, find us on Facebook (New Body Chiropractic & Wellness Center) or call (303) 347-9906.

Matt Kenney7 Tips for dealing with tough times
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Are you committed to a great outcome? Ask yourself these 4 questions.

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In life there are goals we know we can reach and those that we have a desire to reach but will not come easily. For the latter there are steps that must be taken and questions that need to be asked if we’re ever to get there. Today I’d like to share 4 steps I feel are crucial to achieving any major personal, professional or athletic goal.

1. Find your why. Motivation and inspiration are great for getting started. However, they are often easily forgotten once things start getting challenging or serious. Before you set out to achieve any goal you must honestly answer the question of why you want to achieve it. Is it money? Family? Self satisfaction? A desire to improve yourself? Once you’ve nailed down your why, quitting no longer becomes an option because your goal is personally tied to you in a more profound way which makes you willing to do whatever is necessary to achieve it.

2. Be willing to pay the price. To achieve anything worthwhile you’re going to have to sacrifice. I’ve had people ask me to help them lose weight in one sentence and then tell me they’re not giving up certain foods or habits in the next. These people will never succeed. The people that accomplish big things are those that are willing to adopt new strategies, eliminate old habits, adopt new ways of thinking, work harder, eliminate certain comforts and take risks.

3. Challenge your limit. Our society is set up for comfort and to a degree we all need it. However, overcoming challenges that fall outside of our comfort zone is ultimately what makes us more resilient and helps take us from “good” to “great”. Each and every time you push yourself out of a physical or emotional comfort zone your capacity for success grows by re-defining what you once thought of as difficult or normal. For example, your body tries to budget your energy output so it begins producing signs of fatigue at about 60% of your max physical output. If you never challenge that limit you will always get tired around the same time. However, if you aggressively push through that threshold and do your best to expend every bit of energy possible, your body develops a new frame of reference for what tired is. This will train your body to go past that 60% mark allowing you to create more speed, endurance and power going forward. Challenging any limit physically or emotionally works exactly the same way.

4. If you’re stalled, get help. On the path to a goal it is not uncommon to find ourselves stuck due to lack of knowledge, lack of experience, personal baggage or old habits. Sometimes we simply just don’t know what we don’t know. Rather than quit or begin making excuses, enlist the help of someone that can help you. Those with experience that have overcome problems you’re having are excellent examples of people that can assist you when your momentum stalls. Admitting you need help to achieve a goal does not make you weak; rather it is a sign of how committed you truly are.

Dr. Kenney has won multiple awards for “Best Chiropractor” and specializes in helping patients achieve their goals of better health and pain relief. For more information please visit www.NewBodyChiro.com, find us on Facebook (New Body Chiropractic & Wellness Center) or call (303) 347-9906.

Matt KenneyAre you committed to a great outcome? Ask yourself these 4 questions.
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What my worst race and your worst day will teach you

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I run difficult races often and am used to pushing my limits. I’ve competed in 24 hour events, run ultra-marathons, endured hypothermia and pain. At the end I’m usually left feeling satisfied with my performance. This past weekend I did a race that was different for me. It was a 13.4 mile race that started on flat ground (by Colorado standards) and then climbed about 8,000 feet before finishing at the top of a mountain 14,115 feet above sea level.

For the first ¾ of the race I had my “A-game”, felt great and was enjoying the experience. Then at about 13,000 feet with about 3-4 miles to go, it began – acute altitude sickness. Apparently my East coast upbringing did not like me being so high up. From that point on I couldn’t go 50 feet without vomiting which then led to excruciating muscle cramps from an electrolyte imbalance. I had zero energy, couldn’t even hold down water and try as I might, could not generate any momentum. It felt like a combination of exhaustion mixed with having the flu so bad you want to sleep on the cold bathroom floor. Even worse, once you’re up that high there are no trees or shelter so I could only drag myself to the side of the path and listen to “are you ok?” about 1,000 times as runner after runner passed me. It took me 3 hours to trek those final 3 miles and all the goals I had for the race were gone except one. I finished.

On your best day things will happen almost effortlessly and produce tremendous results. The question is how will you react on your worst day? How will you respond after a failed relationship, loss of a job or a business venture gone bad? Will you give up or defiantly keep moving forward? I felt embarrassed after that race until my 5 year old asked about it. I told him I got very sick and ran slow and he responded “but I know you finished, because you never quit.” That changed my perspective instantly. I wasn’t embarrassed anymore; I was proud. Your worst days will teach you much more than your best. You’ll learn what you’re made of, become more resilient in daily life and appreciate the good times more. So the next time you’re forced to endure one of those days, embrace what it will teach you; I did.

Dr. Kenney has won multiple awards for “Best Chiropractor” and specializes in helping patients achieve their goals of better health and pain relief. For more information please visit www.NewBodyChiro.com, find us on Facebook (New Body Chiropractic & Wellness Center) or call (303) 347-9906.

Matt KenneyWhat my worst race and your worst day will teach you
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