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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 23rd

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.  

Something that made me proud.  Last Friday my son suffered a freak injury in his football game, a dislocation of his right patella (kneecap) after someone crashed into the back of his leg.  Fellow players were horrified at the sight of it, and I knew something was very wrong by the angle I saw his leg at.  I got to him just after the medical personnel did, expecting the worst.

What you would expect to see was someone writhing in pain, frustrated (he’d just been called up to varsity as a sophomore), panicked, etc.  Instead, my son was completely calm, polite, and rational.  Even when his kneecap was forcefully put back in place he did not yell or react.  In fact, after I was asked if we wanted an ambulance to remove him from the field, he asked if he could still play the remainder of the game instead!

You never know how you will react when you are under pressure/and or something terrible happens.  My son inspired me with his toughness and cool head as the injury happened.  Since that time, he has continued to impress me with his mental, physical, and spiritual strength dealing with the loss of his season and road to recovery.  Every quality I have ever sought to teach him or which I’d hoped he would develop; he has demonstrated in this challenging situation, and I could not be prouder.   

An analogy I like.  I love the Rocky movies and draw inspiration from them constantly.  At the end of each movie, Rocky will always triumph after overcoming adversity to do so.  Everyone wants to have that type of “Rocky moment” in whatever they are trying to achieve.  The problem is that while people want to be Rocky at the end of a movie, they are unwilling to be the Rocky that trains until he is exhausted, comes back after a loss, or gets beat up for fourteen rounds before pulling out a win in the 15th.  The point is, the sweetest successes in life usually only occur after you’ve suffered, endured, and overcome a great deal to achieve them. 

Something I related to.  I heard someone say recently, “don’t pray to stay safe, pray to be dangerous.”  I immediately wrote that down because it embodies something I genuinely believe in.  When we sit around worrying and living in fear of anything/everything that can happen to us, we are not in control.  We are on the defensive and not making proactive moves or choices.  Rather, we are being reactive.

My personal belief is that life is meant to be played on offense.  In other words, we aggressively pursue the best possible outcomes for ourselves and those we care about.  This doesn’t mean everything goes perfectly but it allows us to be in better control of our results.  Whenever possible, seek to be the strongest, most assertive form of yourself as opposed to the meek, passive, and scared version.  It will make all the difference.

Something I do each day.  I have a series of things I do each morning to prepare me for the day.  These are meant to allow me to face each day with minimal stress, maximum focus, high energy, physical, mental, and spiritual strength.  This process I like to refer to as “putting on my armor.”

For me, this entails getting up early, drinking at least 20 ounces of water first thing, checking on finances for my business and family, enjoying a cup of coffee, intense exercise (lifting weights and/or running), eating a healthy breakfast, showering, spending at least a few minutes with each member of my family (I like to see them laugh and/or smile at least once each), having a to-do list ready, and then saying a prayer.   Years ago, I would start my days in a rush, and they would often quickly go off the tracks.  Now, I “put on my armor” daily and I have very few days that I am not able to manage productively. 

Some quotes I love. 

“A mistake repeated more than once is a choice.” – Paulo Coelho

“Maturity is working through your trauma and not using it as a never-ending excuse for poor behavior.”

“A bottle of water can be .50 cents at a supermarket.  $2 at the gym.  $3 at the movies and $6 on a plane.  Same water.  Only thing that changed its value was the place.  So next time you feel your worth is nothing, maybe you’re at the wrong place.” – Kobi Simmons

“Your words start to lose value when your actions don’t match.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 23rd
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 16th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.  

A great reminder.  I was at a wedding recently and the couple wrote their own vows.  Both were wonderful and reminded me of something, little actions become important things.  Repeated efforts, small gestures, acts of kindness, etc. all combine to make an enormous difference.

Your life operates in a similar fashion.  Wherever you’d like to go in life, if you can start doing the small but important things on a regular basis, you’ll have a shot to get there.  For example, if you’d like to get in better shape and you start making slight changes to what you eat and how you move, it will make a dramatic difference.  The smallest efforts done repeatedly tend to create the biggest changes in the end.

Do I count calories?  Several people asked me this recently.  The answer is that I do not.  I have been eating well for almost 30 years, and most of what I do has become like breathing to me.  I eat about every 3-4 hours and have some type of protein at each meal.  Some of these “meals” are more like snacks but it’s enough to keep my energy level up.  My goal is to have these meals be comprised of foods with high nutritional content as much as possible. 

Therefore, I am never worried about eating too much.  The more active I am, the more calories my body craves, so I eat more as my body demands it.  On the days where I am slightly less active, I tend to instinctively eat less.  Once you get a good feel for what foods are best for you, the nutritional content of what you eat, activity levels, and more; it becomes extremely easy to know exactly what your body requires.

Something I believe.  This week I had an interaction with someone that I have known for decades. This is someone who I am forced to deal with and unfortunately, they are often extremely mean.  I don’t let it get it to me, and make sure that I only respond in a way that is levelheaded and kind.  However, what stood out to me this time, was this person is the same now as they were decades ago.  Nothing has changed, the script is no different. 

Without exception, the people I admire most have an evolution to their lives and character.  In other words, the person they are today is different (but better) than it was 5, 10, or 15 years ago.  This type of growth can only come through experience, self-reflection, acknowledging mistakes, seeking out knowledge, and being honest with oneself.  If someone is not evolving as a person, they are not paying attention to those areas.  Conversely, putting in the work in these areas will produce lasting improvements.  None of us are perfect but we are all capable of evolving into a better version of ourselves.

Something interesting.  I’ve been attending the same church for the past 8 years and the main reason is the pastor.  I enjoy the way he speaks about struggles, triumphs, challenges, and everything in between.  He has grown the church from humble beginnings into something wonderful, and helped countless people along the way.  Recently, I was told that some people that attend the church were “upset” because he bought a nice car.  He’s almost sixty and his children are grown so while I was happy for him, many were apparently not.  I found that ridiculous.

I think it’s wonderful to see people succeed and become rewarded.  If you can’t root for the people that have helped you, who can you?   When someone is secure in who they are, it is not difficult to cheer others on and want the best for them.  There is plenty of success to go around, don’t be afraid to root for those around you to achieve it as well.

Some quotes I love. 

“The world is changed by your example, not your opinion.” – Paulo Coelho

“A poor sailor blames the wind.” – John Miller

“There’s a difference between being informed and being consumed.  Being informed makes you aware and alert of the situation.  Being consumed will only steal your joy and peace.  Be informed not consumed.” – Brandi MacDonald

“Done is better than perfect if perfect ain’t done.” – Eric Thomas

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 16th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 9th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.  

Something I thought was cool.  I have a female patient in her fifty’s that started hockey over the past few years for the first time.  She plays on a team with all men and has worked extremely hard to improve her game.  I see her every couple of weeks and always like to ask her about it.  When I saw her last, she mentioned that her teammates began carrying her hockey bag.  I asked if that had ever happened before, and she said it had not.

The reason I (and she) found this so cool, is that it’s a sign of respect.  When she joined the team, she was given no special treatment.  The other players rarely passed to her, but she worked hard to elevate her skills.  With time, she got better and better, earned trust, and became a contributing member of the team.  Her teammates have recognized this and carrying her hockey bag is their way of acknowledging her efforts.  It’s never easy starting something new or being the least experienced but hanging in there and earning respect is certainly rewarding!

A workout I enjoyed and why.  On August 28th, 2020, my brother-in-law (and a best friend) passed away suddenly and unexpectedly.  It was a horrible blow to myself, my in-laws, and his young family.  To honor him, I always do some type of big workout on this anniversary as well as on his birthday.  I do this because when I exert myself intensely, it clears my mind.  Once that happens, I can recall more memories, think about times together, and remember who he was as a person.

For those interested, the workout I did this year I nicknamed “The Sam.”  It consisted of one hundred repetitions (for each exercise) of burpees, box jumps (30 inches high), pull ups, pushups, dips, and flutter kicks.  I did twenty of each at a time, before going to the next exercise.  I did that for five rounds until I got one hundred of each exercise completed.  Then I did a 3-mile run as fast as possible.  It was a solid workout but gave me time to reflect on my friend.

A wonderful memory and lesson.  My brother-in-law served as my assistant coach in football for years.  One of his strengths was the gift of encouragement he had for some of our less talented players.  He would give them nicknames and connect with them in such a way that caused them to believe in themselves more.  They would adore him, and their level of play would improve.  I would always smile when suddenly a player that barely knew how to play, would be pumped to do something Coach Sam told him he was good at. 

My mother-in-law later told me that when he played football, he was often over-looked and underappreciated.  He played little and was often frustrated.  Therefore, when he would coach kids like that, it was as if he were speaking to them like he would have wanted when he played.  After he died, I have tried my best to do this for all my players because he showed me how profound it can be.  He taught me that sometimes the biggest difference can simply be someone that believes in you and encourages you.

Something I find helpful.   As many of you know, I am training for a 100-mile run in February.  Usually once or twice a week, I will do an impromptu “extra run” on the treadmill in my garage while my kids are out playing, even though I’ve technically completed my workout and run for the day.  I do this to get in some extra miles, but I do it mostly for the mindset it creates. 

I know that over the course of a 100-mile race there will be times when I’m exhausted, bored, and/or in pain.  Putting in extra work when my body is already fatigued is a wonderful way to simulate that feeling.  When you train yourself mentally and physically to go beyond expected limits, it becomes currency you can cash in for resiliency in your toughest moments and darkest hours. 

Some quotes I love. 

“Remember, being happy doesn’t mean you have it all.  It simply means you’re thankful for all you have.”

“It takes a backbone not a wishbone to get results.” – Brandi MacDonald

“Once you learn to carry your own water you will learn the value of every drop.”

“Everybody’s sore.  Everybody’s tired.  Everybody has an excuse.  Don’t be everybody.” – Lewis Caralla

“You’re either getting paid for the decisions you made years ago or you’re paying for the decisions you made years ago.” – Bedros Keuilian

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 9th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 2nd

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.  

A great reminder.  The church our family attends recently moved into a new location after years of arduous work to make it happen.  Since the move, the energy is high, people are even more excited, and the church itself seems to be working even harder to give back to the community.  My wife volunteered and has been lending her time to the church.  I was curious why she decided to do this, and her answer was a great reminder.

She told me that she wanted to volunteer because the church was thriving in so many ways.  Therefore, being around that kind of energy would help her while also paying it forward to others.  When you are around something positive, hopeful, helpful, etc. it has a way of feeding you in return.  Whether church, business, personal relationships, or anything else; get yourself around the good stuff and it will fuel you!

An analogy I think works.  There is a business saying “if you don’t know your numbers, you don’t know your business” which is accurate.  For example, if you’re spending more than you’re making and don’t know it, your business is headed for disaster.  This same concept translates to our health as well.

What numbers should you know about your own health?  These include quantity (and quality) of exercise, how many good or bad things you eat, other things you put into your body (medications, alcohol, etc.), how much time you spend around positive or negative relationships, how much self-care you do or do not do, and so much more.  Just like a business requires the right numbers to thrive, so too will your health.  Give thought to these numbers and others like them and ask yourself if your own health business is thriving or looking to close.

A recent interaction.  My wife and I were on a date together recently and she asked me about a 5 Spot I’d written (she does read them!).  I’d mentioned a type of person I encounter regularly, and she made the comment to me that it wasn’t quite as uplifting as some of my other commentary.  I gave it some thought, and it brings up a critical point.

I am someone that is inherently positive and genuinely believe that anyone can accomplish amazing things with the right mindset and guidance.  At the same time, I am realistic.  It is a tough world out there with challenges that await us daily.  Therefore, when I talk about a type of personality that I may not like, it’s not meant to be negative.  Rather, it is a warning of a certain type of person that can easily impair your progress.  Sometimes, achieving greatness is about avoiding negativity.  That is why I try to identify certain traits in people so that I know which ones must be avoided.

Something I love to see.  I was at Whole Foods over the past week when a woman excitedly offered me the chance to try some bottled teas she was bringing to the marketplace.  In no way do I know anything about bottled tea, nor do I ever buy or drink them.  That said, I tried every flavor she had and bought a bunch for myself.  They tasted good but that wasn’t why I bought them.  I did so because I loved her hustle.  I’m sure she’d spent the morning hearing “no” often, but she was still bringing the high energy and enthusiasm when she approached me to try them. That type of attitude is something I always love to see and do my best to encourage whenever possible!

Some quotes I love. 

“Lazy people do very little work and believe they should be winning.  Winners work as hard as possible and still worry about being lazy.”

“Break the pattern today or the loop will remain tomorrow.”

“Regret won’t change your past.  Anxiety won’t change your future.  Action is the only way to change everything.”

“Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction.  We didn’t pass it on to our children in the bloodstream.  It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same.” – Ronald Reagan

“The world began to crumble when feelings started overruling facts.” – Ricky Gervais

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 2nd
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 26th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.  

A memorable moment.  My oldest son has had some recent frustrations in his athletic career, none that I would assess as his “fault.”  It reminded me of something similar that I’d gone through in my high school career, and an idea formulated in my mind on how to explain this to him.

I brought him with me to the base of a steep hill, about eighty yards high and shared with him that similar experience I’d had in the past.  Then I went on to explain how a hill is a powerful metaphor in life.  Hills, like adversity will always be there.  Despite our best efforts, we can’t avoid them all, we can only control how we deal with them.  Then to sink that lesson in, I told him we’d both sprint up and down that hill ten times, to remind ourselves that we are people that know how to handle adversity.  We did the ten, and he made us go two more times which I loved.  Afterwards, we had a great talk and he told me how much better he felt about everything.

A good reminder for me.  On Saturday, I was out on a 5-mile run, and was thinking about the fact that runs such as these were getting comfortable for me.  As a result, I decided to run the third mile as fast as I could.  I shaved about 2 minutes off my usual pace for that mile and exerting myself in that manner made the final two miles more of a challenge.

I believe that when you are in a comfort zone, the best thing you can do is push the envelope a little bit.  In this instance, I reminded my body that I had another gear I hadn’t been using as often as I should be.  This is true in physical endeavors, business, and life as well.  From time to time, remind your body and mind who is in charge by going past your normal level of exertion, and you will be pleased with the results.

Two things I believe everyone needs.  I am fond of saying that everyone needs hope and hard facts, a term I learned in ultra-running.  Hope is a vital part of life.  It creates the initial spark that leads toward a goal, gives us strength to keep moving forward, and allows us to see the light when it feels we are in darkness.  Everything wonderful in our world begins as hope.

However, hard facts are crucial too.  These are the reality checks we all need but may not want to hear.  For example, you may have the hope that you can lose weight and get in better shape, but if you’re eating fast food constantly and not exercising, it won’t happen.  That is a hard fact. 

Do not ever allow yourself to lose hope, you don’t want to live in a world without it.  At the same time, keep it real.  If you’re not getting it done, don’t make excuses, just start doing whatever is necessary to get where you want to go. 

What does being competitive mean to me?  I believe being competitive is about you and creating the best possible performance or person that you can be.  An opponent can be strong or weak, so judging yourself solely only on outcome is not enough.  As a coach, I’ve had teams that over-achieved only to end up two games below .500.  I’ve been prouder of some of these teams than others with better records.  Some of my proudest races were when I overcame adversity but didn’t necessarily finish where I envisioned.  Competing means that you exhaust your ability to make yourself great.  You exert yourself, strive for more each time, and attempt things that might even be above your pay grade.  Most importantly, you do this regardless of whether anyone is there to witness it or not.  That is being competitive to me.

Some quotes I love. 

“A lot of things have broken my heart but fixed my vision.” – Diamond Dallas Page

“The days you don’t want to are the days you need to.” 

“If you gonna piss like a puppy, stay on the porch and let the big dogs eat.” – Jamaal Williams

“A lot of people tell me to stop and smell the roses.  My response to that is ‘well who the f waters them, trims them and fertilizes them?’  There’s a reason those roses smell.  Someone’s got to do the work.” – Joe DeSena

“Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence.” – Vince Lombardi

“Winners don’t focus on the pain and suffering.  All they see is the end result.  Winning.”

“Be thankful for what you have.  Be fearless for what you want.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 26th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 19th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.  

A simple piece of advice.  “Have some pride” is a piece of advice I give myself often, and one I wish I could give others as well.  As simple as this is, it has wide-ranging applications.  If you’re late all the time, have some pride and show up on time.  If you respond to stress by yelling at everyone around you, have some pride and stay calm.  If it’s always someone else’s fault and you make constant excuses, have some pride and start taking responsibility.  Whatever the situation may be, having pride means that you behave in a manner you won’t regret.  When I tell myself to have pride, I am reminding myself to act in a way that aligns with my principles, sense of decency, work ethic, morals, and more.

An interesting interaction.  My sons and I stopped at a fast casual restaurant last weekend.  I like to tutor my sons about business so as we waited for our food, I remarked to them that if I had a business that needed someone, I would hire the gentleman working the counter.

They wanted to understand why I said that, and I explained that he was enthusiastic, had control of his environment (wasn’t frazzled that it was busy), and I could tell by how the other employees reacted to him that he was respected (despite being younger).  I believe that being energetic, organized, and calm under pressure are huge.  If someone has that, everything else can be taught, and they will excel at whatever they do. 

Do I think young kids should be exercising?  I do believe that the younger kids can start doing some form of exercise, the sooner the better.  However, I think exercise at younger ages should have variety and an aspect of fun to it, rather than being overly intense or regimented.  For example, when my two older sons were younger, I would put them through obstacle courses or let them try unusual things like flipping tires or battle ropes.  As they got to around age 12, they got interested in working out with weights, so I helped them with that.  The sooner children can get an appreciation for exercise, moving their bodies, and the benefits thereof; the better!

An analogy I think works.  Have you ever watched a commercial for a pharmaceutical, where everyone looks happy and fulfilled as they tell you what the wonder drug will help you with?  Looks amazing, until they start mentioning the side effects, right?  Just like taking a medication causes side effects, the choices you make each day will as well.

Everything you do to your body or put into it will have a side effect.  Those side effects will either be positive or negative depending on the choice.  When you are eating nutritious food or exercising, the “side effects” are likely to be more energy, weight loss, better sleep, lower stress, and more.  When you’re eating food that isn’t good for you, drinking a lot, and making poor choices, the side effects are likely to be weight gain, lethargy, lack of motivation, anxiety, and the like.  Think of every decision you make for your body in this way, and it becomes much simpler.  Choices will either harm you or help you, it’s that simple!

Some quotes I love. 

“When you feel like quitting, think about why you started.”

“Listening never gets you in trouble but talking can.” – Mike Tyson

“Laws not applied fairly or evenly are not laws.” – Tim Kennedy

“The best leaders are passionate about developing emerging leaders, because true leaders don’t create more followers, they create more leaders.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 19th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 12th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.  

An interesting observation.  I would estimate that in each week, I talk to at least 10-15 patients or people in my personal life that are what I would call “Know it all’s.”  They come for my help or ask my advice only to then begin telling me everything they know, while ignoring anything I might have to say.  The problem is most of these people know extraordinarily little.  In fact, most usually only know enough to get in their own way.

This is common, we all know those people that are “experts” on anything/everything and aren’t afraid to tell you so or criticize you.  In my experience, the people that truly know the most never feel they must prove it to you.  They are confident in what they know and share information and experience with you when necessary.  The harder someone works to convince me they know everything, the more I believe they do not. 

Something that has been helping me.  One of my patients is a medical massage therapist and we got into a conversation about stretching.  She mentioned to me how important it is to hold stretches for 40-60 seconds.  I am naturally flexible and impatient, so my usual routine usually consists of a few random stretches for 10-15 seconds each before and/or after exercise.  Based on her expertise however, I decided to try it.

Holding the stretches for 40 seconds has made a tremendous difference for me.  Before going on a run, I do quad, hamstring, adductor, and hip flexor stretches in this manner and my legs have felt much fresher and looser.  I repeat this after the run and have noticed my legs are recovering far faster than usual.  Even doing one set of a longer duration stretches, seems to be having a positive effect on the muscle I’m targeting.  Try it and see what you think!

Something to remember.  Have you ever struggled with a tough decision over something major in your life?  Certainly, you have.  Often these decisions are so difficult because whichever way you choose can have both pluses and minuses, as well as long-term ramifications.  That’s why I always like to remind people (and myself) that not every decision will come with thunderous applause.  Many of the best decisions you make in your lifetime may be criticized initially. 

It’s important to weigh all options but eventually go with your gut.  Your choice may not be right for everyone, but if it’s ethical, made in good faith, and you believe it’s the correct one for you, that’s what matters.  I would estimate that the decisions I’ve made in my life of which I am the proudest, less than half were thought to be the right move by those around me at the time. 

Something I heard and loved.  “Put an expiration date on it.”  This was the advice of Eric Thomas, a well-known motivational speaker I enjoy listening to.  I believe mistakes we’ve made, times we’ve been wronged, regrets we have, past experiences, perceived failures, you name it; can become like an anchor in our lives if we’re not careful.  I would also add that we don’t want to coast on past triumphs and successes either.  Both prevent us from moving forward in the way we should.  In either case, let the best of your times and the worst of your times have an expiration date so that you can move ahead the best you can in the present.

Some quotes I love. 

“If an old dude ever gives you advice while peeling an apple with a pocketknife and eating pieces right off the blade, you should probably take it.”

“Many things are not equal, but everyone gets the same 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.  We make time for what we truly want.”

“Until it’s your turn, keep clapping for others.”

“You cannot predict your final day, so go hard for the good times while you can.” – Kenny Stabler

“I’ve got a theory that if you give 100% all of the time, somehow things will work out in the end.” – Larry Bird

“Stop letting your past define you.  It was a lesson, not a life sentence.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 12th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 5th

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On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.  

Something I’m excited for.  I signed myself up for a 100-mile race at the beginning of February in Texas. It will have been 3 years since my last 100-mile race, and honestly, I didn’t expect to ever attempt one again.  Since my last race, I have suffered the two greatest tragedies of my life, unexpectedly losing my brother-in law at age 32, and then my sister at age 43.  I am running this race in large part due to those losses.

The race takes place on my brother in law’s birthday, in Texas where my sister lived the last 7 years of her life.  I selected this race because it felt like a perfect way to honor and feel connected to them both.  I am certain that throughout my extensive training, and on race day, I will think of them often. Though I’m sure it sounds odd, this will be therapy and will help me heal. 

“Are you sure you’re ready for this?”  This was the exact question my oldest son asked me when I told him I signed up for another 100-mile race.  The honest answer is no.  I’ll be 3 years older and slower than I was at my last 100-mile race by the time this one starts.  This challenge scares me, and I love it.

Running 100 miles straight is as challenging and brutal as you’d expect, which will require a ton of intense training.  It will also bring me to my absolute limit physically and mentally on race day.  Knowing this will be my final race of this kind, is extremely exciting.  Races like this often leave me feeling like I must top myself again somehow, so having an exit date makes it feel more special for me.  I will give this final race everything I have, and I hope at the end, I will walk away proud and a better version of myself. 

Something I heard and loved.  This week I heard the phrase, “execution over excuses.” This appealed to me and though simple, I feel is important.   I encounter people constantly that tell me what they know they should be doing, followed by a litany of excuses why they aren’t.  For example, how they know exercise would help them but they’re busy, tired, whatever.

This is always fascinating because it’s as if they’ve been given the answer to a problem, only to ignore it.  In fact, more energy is usually spent on justifying, explaining excuses, and complaining than on pursuing the solutions.  If there is something you know would help a problem you’re having, start executing rather than making excuses.

Something I believe.  We all have worries.  They can be personal, financial, business-related, health-related, you name it.  I believe that how we mentally deal with our worries can make all the difference in the world.  When I described my thoughts on this matter with a patient this week, she eloquently told me that what I described is called “Even if” rather than “What if?”

“What if?” is a state of mind where we scare ourselves silly with all outcomes and variables without really using them to our advantage.  We worry and stress about issues both large and small but don’t do anything to break the pattern.  “Even if” is where we start by considering what the worst possible outcome can be.  Once we understand what that is, we usually understand it’s not as bad as we thought, and it loses power over us.  Then, because we know how we don’t want it to end, we start taking steps to create the result we desire.  One mindset uses worry to paralyze us, while the other uses it as a weapon for success.

Some quotes I love. 

“Only you can master your mind, which is what it takes to live a bold life filled with accomplishments most people consider beyond their capability.” – David Goggins

“If the grass is greener on the other side, stop staring, stop comparing, and start watering the grass you’re standing on.”

“Speak when you are angry, and you will make the best speech you will ever regret.” – Ambrose Bierce

“The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule.” – H.L. Mencken

“Stop trying to skip the struggle.  That’s where character is built.  Embrace it.  Learn from it.  Grow from it.”

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Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 5th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – July 29th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.  

A simple tip.  Something I do each day is to drink at least 20-30 ounces of water first thing each morning.  Your body is 50% water and your brain 70%, which should tell you how important this is.

Drinking water first thing helps re-hydrate the body after sleeping, increases alertness, helps muscles feel looser and more flexible, and allows the body to shed toxins.   Before you get to your morning coffee, try drinking at least twenty ounces of filtered water once you get up.  I promise you will notice positive changes!

Something I’ve been enjoying.  My wife and I have been watching “The Bear” which is a fictional show about a world-renowned chef coming back to run a struggling family restaurant he inherited after the death of his brother.  Though it is a work of fiction, there are themes within the show that I enjoy. 

First, the chef begins by implementing specific processes and procedures.  These are simple but vital.  They involve cleanliness, steps to follow, time checks, and checkpoints along the way to make sure things are finished.  What I enjoy about seeing these implemented on the show, (and true in real life) is they lead to better individual work, greater quality of production collectively, and finally to more success within the business.  I believe these principles can and will work in any setting.  Set the tone from the top, communicate what must be achieved, create steps that lead to quality and quality control, and then eventually remarkable things will happen.

Something I believe.  “I was too tired,” “It was so hot,” “It was really hilly,” “I was dog sitting,” “It’s a lot of work,” “Someone else should have done it,” “I knew it wasn’t going to be easy.”  These are a few excuses I’ve heard over the past week for assorted reasons.  As you read them to yourself, did any of them wow you?  Of course not. 

There is a saying I love “No one cares, work harder” that I remind myself of constantly.  I believe that we must constantly work and train ourselves not to make excuses.  This is because they are a waste of time and energy, and ultimately no one really cares to hear them.  Excuses drive you down a path where lower performance, standards, and expectations are acceptable.  Instead of making excuses, accept full responsibility for everything and tell yourself that no matter what, you will find a way.

A good reminder.  Last week, one of my son’s seemed frustrated with football.  Nothing major had happened but I could tell that he was in a funk because I’ve been there many times myself.  Often, when we hit a patch like this, we seek to find a complicated solution or way forward.  I do the opposite.

In this case, I brought my son to the field and began having him do drills based on things we did when I coached him at age 9 or 10.  I tailored them so that they would be relevant to his current level of competition and skill, while reminding him of where he’d come from and how far he’d come.  By the time we left the field, he was smiling and feeling more confidence, which has carried over into his play over the past week.

This is a good method to follow when you’re in a rut.  Go back to the beginning, remember the basics, build yourself back up, and remember who you are and what you can do!

Some quotes I love. 

“Not all storms come to disrupt your life.  Some come to clear your path.”

“A harmless man is not a good man.  A good man is a dangerous man who has that under control.” – Jordan Peterson

“When you’re not used to being confident, confidence feels like arrogance.  When you’re used to being passive, being assertive feels like aggression.  When you’re not used to getting your needs met, prioritizing yourself feels selfish.  Your comfort zone is not a good benchmark.” – Brandi MacDonald

“’But what can I do?  I am just one person.’ Said 7 billion people.”

“6 months of focus and hard work can put you 5 years ahead in life.  Don’t underestimate the power of consistency and desire.” 

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – July 29th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – July 22nd

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.  

A recent experience.  I am currently coaching a flag football team of 4–6-year-olds.  The league has only three teams and most of the kids have never played before.  There is no strategy involved, and as the coach, my job is to try and teach the kids fundamentals, get them lined up correctly, remind them which way to run, and provide enthusiasm.  In fact, I spend as much time helping and encouraging the other team as I do my own.

On Saturday, we played a team for the second time, which has two players closer to age seven that are incredibly fast.  They easily score on us each time they touch the ball and pull our flags in the backfield before we can even begin running.  We’d lost by halftime, but at this level that didn’t concern me.  What did bother me, was that the opposing coach continued to play these two older boys in such a way that they were demoralizing my team, while ignoring his own (only those two players were doing anything but standing around).  He cheered like he was coaching in a professional game, and after a game and half of this, I’d seen enough.  He excitedly ran down the field after a “big play” at which point I stopped and confronted him.

I was not mean, but I was direct and told him what I thought of his behavior, reminded him that our job was to uplift these young kids, and what I expected of him going forward.  My wife would tell you I was intimidating, but I like to think I was just honest.  Had I not said anything, I could not have looked myself in the mirror.  I don’t relish confronting anyone, but sometimes it’s necessary, especially when you are in a leadership position.  To the other coach’s credit, he did an excellent job after we spoke.  I have been on the receiving end of tough criticism many times and it often hurts in the moment but is invaluable going forward. 

Something that inspired me.  Last week, a man by the name of Bob Becker tried to become the oldest finisher of the Badwater 135 at 77 years young.  This race is one of the most brutal imaginable, covering one hundred and thirty-five miles straight through Death Valley in 115 plus degree temperatures beginning at the lowest elevation in our country and going to the highest.  Bob gave everything he had during the race to try and accomplish the goal but narrowly missed by 17 minutes. 

The attempt alone inspired me but what he did to complete the race really got me fired up.  His body would no longer allow him to run or even stand fully upright, and he was cramping so badly coming up the steep terrain that he finished the final mile of the race crawling on all fours.  Watching this older gentleman crawl to the end of one of the most grueling races imaginable, refusing help of any kind, and having people chant his name was amazing to me.  I have been in some brutal races myself and I know what it takes to finish one even under optimal circumstances.  Watching Bob Becker finish that race when he had every excuse not to was next-level toughness that inspired me tremendously!

A simple but crucial question.  Assets are useful or valuable things.  This is true of business assets as well as those that we collect personally.  The question I find most important though, are you an asset to those around you?  Do you make your family, friends, work environment, team, business, etc. better? 

I think if you can make someone or something better then you are an asset.  This can be done through love, friendship, hard work, critical thinking, humor, encouragement, effort, or any number of other means.  Becoming an asset can happen quickly but the value grows exponentially over time.  Ask yourself if you are an asset to those around you and if not, how you might be able to be.

Something I have found effective.  Years ago, when I began coaching football, there was so much myself and my coaches wanted to share with our players.  These included fundamentals, strategy, experiences, and more.  What I noticed was the more we communicated at once, the less the players retained.  It was like drinking from a fire hose and they couldn’t take it all in.  That is when I began breaking things down into three actionable steps (sometimes less).  With only three things to focus on, my team was able to retain information easier and become more effective in each area. 

Having seen the benefit of this approach in sports, I began to use it more in my everyday life.  Anytime I have a personal or business goal I want to achieve, I define what my three most effective steps to attain it will be, and then begin following through on them.  Likewise, if I have a daunting task or event in front of me, I ask myself what three steps I must take to conquer it.  This straightforward way of planning creates efficiency, proficiency, and reduces stress every time it is followed!

Some quotes I love. 

“The days that break you are the days that make you.” 

“Crawling is acceptable.  Falling is acceptable.  Crying is acceptable.  Blood is acceptable.  Pain is acceptable.  Quitting is not.”

“It is impossible to win the race unless you venture to run, impossible to win the victory unless you dare to battle.” – Richard M. DeVos

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – July 22nd
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