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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 27th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.  

Something interesting.  I often run early in the morning while pushing my daughter in a jogging stroller.  On many of these runs, I see this older man walking and waving a stick in the air in a circular motion and talking aloud.  A couple weekends ago, my wife, the kiddos and I were out walking, and he was out doing his thing.  I made a comment to my wife like “that guy is crazy” after he’d walked by us.

My wife heard him speaking and told me “Matt he’s praying.  He’s asking that the people around him be protected.”  I felt bad for misjudging him and then immediately felt respect for him.  What I judged as crazy was just him looking out for myself and the other people in our neighborhood.  Now when I see him during my runs, I make sure to give him a salute, a high five or a thumbs up and say “thank you” to him.  Anybody that cares about people other than themselves is cool with me!

Something disappointing.  As you know, my sister died a couple of weeks ago at age 43 without warning.  I got the news at 5am on a Tuesday morning and was on a plane to see her within hours.  I missed three days of work and was back seeing patients that Friday which was challenging.

Eighty percent of the patients I spoke with were extremely kind, loving, and empathetic.  Though you may not expect it however, twenty percent were not.  I listened to people complain (often passive aggressively) about how they were inconvenienced by me not being available due to a tragedy.  When I would point out that I was only out three of the five days that week, most would explain that they had commitments that made it “inconvenient” for them to come in on the days I was actually in the office.  I literally held my sister until her last breath and then left to fly home and begin seeing patients hours later.  This was not enough for some people as it turns out, they wanted to be seen on a day I was not there.  The lack of empathy and kindness was surprising and as someone that puts all I have into helping my patients, disappointing. 

I could have handled this unkindness in a variety of ways.  I could have yelled at them, kicked them out, or refused to ever see them again.  In the end, I chose to let it go.  I took the good vibes and kind words of the patients that cared and let that fuel me.  The unkind words I heard, I ignored.  In life, we cannot control much of what happens to us and around us, but we do have the power to control how we react to it.

An important concept.  “Listen to your body” is a phrase we’ve all heard.  It is important to do so to avoid injuries, recover faster, and perform at your peak.  However, based upon my experience, I would add a caveat to it.

Listening to your body does not mean resting every day, quitting when it gets hard, becoming less disciplined, and/or skipping the things that test you.  Often, I interact with people that tell me they are listening to their body, only to have them explain to me why they are being lazy and avoiding even the slightest bit of discomfort or challenge. 

We all get sore, tired, bored, etc. but we must persevere.  Observe the feedback your body provides and learn from it.  Listening to your body most often involves making small adjustments rather than simply foregoing activity or challenges.  If you are constantly taking an easy way out, you are not actually listening to your body, you are listening to the voice telling you to quit.   

A recent experience.  I called up someone important to me recently and apologized to them.  I didn’t do anything horribly wrong, but I felt I could have done better.  In other words, my actions did not live up to my standards.  Rather than make excuses, I called that person up, told them I screwed up, and was sorry.  I asked nothing in return but made it clear I felt I could have done better.  The person thanked me for my apology, told me that they had not been mad, and that it was fine. 

We must hold ourselves accountable in life.  When we do something in error, fall short, or behave in a way we regret; the best remedy is to simply admit it, do what we can to fix it, and then move on.  Making excuses or lying to ourselves only makes it worse. 

Some quotes I love. 
“Every man’s life ends the same way.  It is only the details of how he lived and how he died that distinguish one man from another.” – Ernest Hemingway

“It’s not over when you lose, it’s over when you quit.”

“They don’t make statues of critics.”

“Deep down inside you know if you’re doing the work or not.” – Joe De Sena

“You have to meet people where they are.  And sometimes you have to leave them there.”

“Hardships often prepare ordinary people for an extraordinary destiny.” – C.S. Lewis

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 27th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 20th (Memorial Edition)

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  Unfortunately, over the past week I’ve had to deal with the tragic death of my sister at the age of 43.  She was extremely healthy and had just run her first marathon in December.  She and I were very close, and she leaves behind a husband and two young children.  Today, I’d like to share some thoughts I’ve had from that tragedy that hopefully you will find meaning in.

Something that inspired me.  About twenty years ago, I talked to a friend of mine about why he became a chiropractor.  He told me that he had been spinning his wheels in life until he went to the funeral of a friend of a friend.  At the end of the funeral, everyone stood up and gave the man a standing ovation.  My friend told me that it occurred to him if someone could be celebrated like that in death, then he should be doing so much more in his life.  It became the turning point in his life.

My sister was an organ donor, and in being in such great shape, those organs will be put to good use.  At the hospital, they do an “honor walk” when someone donates their organs.  This is where people can line up and watch as the body is brought to the operating room where the organs will be removed and then sent out to save lives. 

My sister was accompanied by family as she was brought on her honor walk which is common.   What was not common however, lining the halls on both sides were over 300 people, all of which were family and friends that made trips from all over the country to be there.  The doctors and nurses said that they had never seen an honor walk attended by so many people.  Just like that story I had heard years ago; my sister ended her life with a standing ovation.  It inspires me to do even more with my own life and the gifts I’ve been given.

Something my sister taught me.  As I mentioned, my sister had people immediately come to be near her when they heard what had happened.  Few of these people were local and most made long trips to get there.  What stood out to me most, was that these people were from every part of her life.  Childhood, old dance friends, college friends, law school friends, work friends, old neighbors, and more. 

It occurred to me that to keep that close with so many people from her past must have required a lot of effort.  To be honest, I am excellent at pushing myself to the limit physically and mentally but have often failed to make effort in reaching out to people. 

What my sister taught me was to go the extra mile.  Pick up the phone and make another call, reach out to someone you haven’t heard from recently, go the extra step for the people important to you.  My sister did that, and as more and more people showed up to see her, I realized I need to as well.

How am I doing? Many people have reached out to me to show their support and ask how I’m doing. Having lost my brother-in-law (and best friend) less than two years ago at the age of 32, people know I am no stranger to these tragedies, and many have expressed worry for me.

I believe in times of crisis; you will fall back to the level of your training.  While nothing can fill the hole of my sister’s loss (for me or others), I have spent the last 10 years or more teaching myself to overcome adversity in any form.  Though I am deeply saddened, I will continue to move forward with faith, focus, ferocity, positivity, and more.  I would never allow this tragedy to serve as an excuse to fall apart.  I will continue to become a stronger leader and look to help my family and my sister’s family in every way possible.  As I did when my brother-in-law passed, I will live my life in a manner that honors them.  This means that I will give the very best I can of myself until one day, it is my time to go. 

Something I loved.  As most of you know, I coach 11–12-year-old boys in football.  Most I have coached since age 7 and they have become like sons to me.  On Saturday, I returned to coaching after being in Texas with my sister and family.  Before our game, one of my players came up to me with a sealed envelope and gave me a hug.  He told me to open it when I got home.

Inside the envelope was a handwritten card with two meaningful Bible verses and a note that told me he had been thinking of me, praying for me, and that he loved me.  I cried as I read it, but in 46 years of life, it was the most touching card I’ve ever received.  That young man gave me a boost of strength with his words, and I truly appreciated it.

In life, the people that pick us up when we are down are not always those you’d expect.  That 11-year old’s card picked me up in a big way and reminded me of some important things.  He gave me extra strength when I needed it and it meant the world to me.  At some point, you may be that person to someone you would not think and someone you might not expect may be that person for you.

Some quotes my sister loved. 

“Be that kind soul that makes everybody feel like a somebody.”

“When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, “Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.” – Fred Rogers

“Those we love never truly leave us. There are things that death cannot touch.” – Jack Thorne

“How you deal with the hardest days defines who you truly are.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 20th (Memorial Edition)
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 13th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

Something that bothered me.  The football team I coach is comprised of 11- and 12-year old’s, most of whom I have coached since age 7.  We’ve always been good, but this season we have been dominant.  The boys all work hard, know our system well, and have played together for so long which has made an enormous difference.  After a recent win, I was contacted by the league.  They told me that parents of the opposing teams had complained about us doing so well and asked for proof of my players’ ages.  They felt that because of our performance, we must have boys that were too old for the league on our team.  In other words, they accused us of cheating.

I was disappointed to hear this for two main reasons.  First, as anyone that knows me would tell you, I do not cut corners or cheat on anything.  My moral code would never allow it and being accused of doing so, crossed a line for me, and made me mad. 

Second, too many people have forgotten how to take a loss.  I’ve played or coached in games where I’ve left the field embarrassed by how poorly I/we did.  That feeling is horrible but it’s a powerful tool.  It can be used to identify weaknesses and implement processes and actions that lead to improvement.  When you make excuses and blame others for your own inferior performance, those losses become wasted and lead to nothing constructive.  Worse, it creates a mindset that you are entitled to win and if you don’t, you were treated unfairly.  Not a great life lesson.  Always try to win, but if you don’t; handle it with class and learn from it.

Something I have found useful.  I pride myself on pushing the envelope physically through my training to strengthen myself mentally.  When my body wants to quit, I am forced to rely upon my mind to get me through.  Over the years, I have found diverse ways to accomplish this but today I’ll share one I use often.

When I am alone, exhausted, and would like nothing more than to be done with what I’m doing; I picture my family, friends, people I care for most, those that look up to me, etc.  These people care about me so when I compete or train, I like to feel that I do so in their name too.  No matter what, I can control the effort I put in.  If I give my absolute best than I honor those people, anything less I view as disrespectful to them (and me).  This mindset has helped me out of some painful and dark situations by making me feel less alone and more motivated to persevere. 

A question I get all the time.  “Can Dr. Kenney fix this?”  We get calls to our office daily from new patients asking if I can resolve a certain condition for them.  Often, these people have tried other things without success and are looking for a guarantee that I can fix it for them before they invest any time and money.  I bring this up to illustrate a key point.  No one can ever give you guarantees about your health because every person and situation are unique.

When people look for assurances, all I can offer them is the experience I have/do not have treating certain conditions.  I also make sure they understand until I examine and/or treat them, any expectations of outcomes I might have, would only be theoretical.  I have helped people with back pain millions of times, but if someone asked me if I could fix their back pain, I would still say “I don’t know.”  What if they show up with a metal rod in their back?  What if they have something that only a surgery could fix?  I would not be able to help those things and would have given them false hope.  When it comes to your health remember there are no guarantees.  It is your responsibility to research which avenues may potentially help you and then pursue and try those you feel most confident with. 

Something important.  My wife had a woman referred to her for the metabolic testing service we offer.  My wife reached out to her as promised and the woman was rude, complained, and behaved like a child, all over scheduling a 10-minute test that she’d requested.  Worse, this woman owns her own business and I’m sure would never enjoy people behaving that way toward her.  This reminded me of two important things.

First, I believe that how you treat anyone is how you treat everyone.  If I see someone treating someone poorly, talking down to them, or behaving badly toward them; I lose all trust in them.  I don’t care if they’d make me money or help me in some way, I will not associate with them.  I am certain at some point, I would become the recipient of such behavior and am saving myself the headache.

Second, reputation is everything.  When you treat people well, word gets around and if you treat them poorly, it spreads like wildfire.  People you might think are not observing your behavior are.  Down the line, how you behaved when you thought no one was looking, may come back to you in either a positive or negative fashion.  None of us are perfect, but consistent, good behavior is necessary in building a solid reputation.    

Some quotes I love. 

“If you think tough men are dangerous, wait until you see what weak men are capable of.” – Jordan Peterson

“Entitlement = Hardly showing up and expecting results in the short term.  Hustle = Showing up consistently and expecting results in the long term.” – Brandi McDonald

“The words you talk, better be the words you walk.” – Eddie Gallagher

“Sometimes the hell in front of you can be so dark and painful that it is incomprehensible, but we still must fight.  It is in those moments when everyone else wants to quit that you must step up and be that one warrior.” – David Goggins

“Stay away from people who act like a victim in a problem they created.” – Rick Lopp

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 13th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 6th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

A recent experience.  My wife and I consulted with a woman recently about her nutrition.  She went into detail about how she had slow digestion, and her doctor insisted that everything she eat have high amounts of fiber.  The way things were explained to us, she had some exceedingly rare and unique digestive issues and so we asked her to fill out a food log for us to evaluate.  Upon reviewing the log, I saw no foods high in fiber but did see candy, fast food, and a lot of alcohol.

I do not mention this as a criticism of this person, because it’s not.  She is a nice lady that just needed the right help.  The point I’m making is that we often look for complicated answers to simple questions.  In this case, this woman did not actually have a complex issue, she had simply been eating terrible foods that her body could not process efficiently. 

To correct this, we recommended replacing some of the bad foods she was consuming with better, more nutritious options.  Immediately, she began to improve (in multiple aspects).  To correct any issue, the best way to begin is by addressing the simplest issues and then moving on to more complex ones only if necessary.  Don’t over-think it!

A good reminder.  On Easter Sunday, I was informed that someone had spray painted my office sign as well as those of some of my neighbors.  This bummed me out but, in the end, was a good reminder to me of how best to manage problems when they arise.

First, don’t feel sorry for yourself, just accept that it happened and move on.  Second, get to work on a solution.  In this instance, I researched what might remove spray paint from that surface and went and bought what I needed.  Once I’m on to step two, I already feel better because I’m pursuing something constructive and feel more in control. 

Third, fix the issue.  For simple matters like this, it can happen instantly, but more complex ones may take time.  Regardless, get to work correcting them as soon as possible.  Finally, understand that things will go wrong from time to time, often through no fault of your own. These issues may not be pleasant, but they tend to make you stronger in knowledge and/or resilience if managed properly.

Something important.  Being coachable is one of the greatest assets a person can have in my opinion.  This allows the ego to move to the side, so added information can be taken in and used to make improvements.  Conversely, when someone is not coachable, they tend to remain in a pattern, one that is usually not beneficial to them.

When my wife and I help people in our fitness and nutrition business, I can tell instantly whether they are coachable.  If they are, they will succeed and if they are not, they won’t.  It’s that simple.

The signs that some will allow themselves to be coached, are a willingness to accept criticism, take recommendations, try alternatives, ask questions, and more.  On the other hand, if someone cannot be coached, they will tell you they don’t like to listen to other people, are unwilling to change what they’re doing (even if it’s bringing horrible results), will blame others, and will often seek other opinions only to not follow those as well.  Be coachable, it will make a tremendous difference in the results you can obtain in life.

Something to remember.  One of our clients in our SAM Program was told by her doctor that because she was 40 years old, she would never be able to lose any weight.  Anyone with any experience in this field would understand this is not true but it brings up two important points.

First, never allow one person to ruin a dream or goal for you.  There are many haters out there and usually the most adamant ones are the least knowledgeable.  Find people that can help you attain the goals you want.  In this instance, this woman was easily able to lose weight with basic advice that we provided.

Second, age is only a number.  Your body does not quit when it reaches a round number such as 30, 40, or 50.  As a chiropractor, I constantly hear people blame their age when they’re in pain (even in their twenty’s!).  I promise you; your body does not wait until you hit a certain number and then begin failing on you.  What tends to happen is that someone reaches an age where they stop giving proper effort toward their health.  We certainly have less leeway with our health as we age so lack of effort becomes noticeable quickly.  Do not give up on yourself simply because you reached another birthday, keep battling!

Some quotes I love. 

“You have to change your life if you’re not happy and wake up if things aren’t going the way you want.” – Keanu Reeves

“No matter how hard you work, someone else is working harder.” – Elon Musk

“Do what is easy and your life will be hard.  Do what is hard and your life will become easy.” – Les Brown

“Thinking will not overcome fear, but action will.” – W. Clement Stone

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – May 6th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 29th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

Something I notice.  My wife and I own a fitness and nutrition business and help people of all ability and experience levels.  For us to help our clients, we need to know their habits and routines.  Often, people are embarrassed when seeking our help and they withhold information as a result.  Other times, people are brutally honest, and we get the complete story warts and all.  Of these two, the people who are honest always get remarkable results. 

For someone to be helped, they must first start by being honest with themselves and identify areas that need improvement.  If that step does not happen, it will not matter what comes after because in my experience it will not work.  Whether it’s the need to get in better shape physically, financially, in business, or anything else; having the courage to assess yourself and admit you need help is step one.  Then, through an honest assessment of your history, habits, and routine you can begin to develop methods that lead to lasting changes in these areas.  As I say to my wife all the time “I don’t care how bad it is, if someone is honest then we can help them.”

An interesting interaction.  I had a conversation with a gentleman recently that is typical of one I have often.  This man is a nice person but went on and on about how I should start slowing down with my exercise, running, etc. that I write about in these posts.  He’s 20 years older than me and barely active himself, but kept going on about how because of my age this was important (I’m 46) in his opinion.

Too often, we are encouraged to simply give up once we reach a certain age or milestone.  I do not believe in that.  Our bodies are meant to be used and our lives to be lived.  Does the way I train, my intensity, and the races I do put pressure on my body?  Of course, but it would be far worse to sit on my couch eating all day and doing nothing. 

My choice is to try to utilize my mind and body to their fullest potential.   This involves challenging myself to do things that are hard and to repeat that process again and again.  If my body is a vehicle, I hope when I die, I roll in with the tank well past empty, four flat tires and smoke coming out of the engine.  My desire is to have a well-worn body with plenty of scars that tell stories.  Giving up on challenging myself because I’m “too old” or out of fear of getting hurt is not in the cards for me.  I’m never careless with my health or body but I intend to push myself as hard as I can for as long as possible.

An important question.  I talk to dozens of patients each day.  As a result, they tell me things that they love all the time. These can be certain foods, types of exercise, activities, ways of doing things, you name it.  A question I often ask when they tell me these things is “does it love you back?”

Just like a relationship needs two loving and willing partners to succeed, the things you love should love you back by providing benefit to you.  Anything that makes you healthier mentally, physically, emotionally, or spiritually I would say loves you back.  Conversely, things that damage you in these areas are not showing you love in return even if you continue to do them.  Do yourself a favor and examine your most common habits, routines, and actions by asking yourself “does it love me back?”  If it does, keep it rolling but if it does not, make a change.

Something I think of daily.  There is a saying often attributed to Native American cultures (among others) that I ran across 6-7 years ago that states “Today is a good day to die.”  The meaning of this phrase is not that you hope to die but that if you were to, that you would have no regrets.

From the second I saw this statement; it became important to me.  My goal is to behave and live my life in such a manner that if I were to pass away, I would be content with how things stood.  Specifically, I want my relationships with those important to me to be in good standing, my actions to be honest and well-intentioned, and my efforts in all I do to be as high as possible.  I often repeat this phrase to myself at times in the morning as a reminder to behave in this manner.  We never know when we’ll go but I believe it’s good practice to try and live so that if today were the day, that we’d be proud of where we left off.

Some quotes I love. 

“Most of us aren’t defeated in one decisive battle.  We are defeated one tiny, seemingly insignificant surrender at a time that chips away at who we should really be.” – Jocko Willink

“Discipline is choosing between what you want now and what you want most.” – Abraham Lincoln

“Every bite of food you eat is a short-term investment in how you feel, a mid-term investment in how you look, and a long-term investment in your freedom from disease.” – Joe De Sena

“Waste no more time arguing about what a good man should be.  Be one.” – Marcus Aurelius

“Assume that the person you are listening to might know something you don’t.” – Jordan Peterson

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 29th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 22nd

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

Something important.  Have you ever argued passionately about a subject with someone only to discover you were wrong?  How did you handle it?  Did you admit you were not right and move on?  Or did you double down on what you said knowing you were dead wrong?

It is never fun to be incorrect, but it happens to all of us.  When we’re mistaken, the pro-level move is to say we are wrong, make whatever amends/changes that are necessary, and then move on.  Far too often in our society, government, and individual interactions; however, we double down on mistakes out of ego and an unwillingness to admit fault.  In these instances, we compound the issue by continuing to fight even when we know we’re wrong.  That is the amateur move. 

If you’re wrong, you don’t have to celebrate it. However, saying “my bad” and trying to correct your mistakes will earn you far more respect (including self-respect), than continuing to battle when you know you’re in the wrong.    

Something I learned about.  Parkinson’s Law is a concept that whatever amount of time we assign to a task is what we tend to use to complete it.  As an example, if you tell yourself that you need three days to clean your basement, it will take three days to finish it, but might have only required one.  If you think you’ll need 12 weeks to get ready for a half marathon, Parkinson’s Law says that you will use 12, even if 8 would suffice or be better.

I believe Parkinson’s Law to be accurate but whenever possible, I try to go against it.  If we trim wasted time, sub-maximal effort, etc. from our approach, we can often do what is expected to take a long while, in a fraction of that time.  For example, I used to take 45 minutes to an hour to complete my weight workouts when I was younger.  Now, I have condensed that to 20-25 minutes by removing wasted time and increasing my intensity.  I use less time and get better results this way. 

I recently heard someone say that when it comes to goals, decide how long you think it will take to achieve, then cut that time in half.  Making your timeframe’s tighter leads you to improve procedures, increase focus, waste less time, and up the intensity.  This leads to greater and faster progress. 

Something I liked.  I was at a wedding recently and the officiant marrying the couple said many wonderful things.  One thing that stood out to me was some advice he gave the couple, “Pay attention to the little things because little things are the big things.”

I find that statement to be true in relationships, business, athletics, coaching, and so much more.  When you pay attention and attend to the details others may not, you become far more invested and connected to the endeavor, person, and/or interaction involved.  Paying attention to the little things takes effort, but that effort can pay enormous dividends for anything and everything in life that you can imagine.

Something I related to.  My wife and I have been watching “Tournament of Champions,” a cooking competition on Food Network.  One of my favorite competitors has been a chef that is incredibly intense.  When introduced to the crowd, he walks out more like it’s a fight then time to cook.  He is incredibly intense, doesn’t joke around, and performs to an elevated level.  Once it’s over, he accepts either victory or defeat with class and shows profound respect to his opponent.

To some, they might think it odd to be that intense about cooking food.  I do not agree.  To me, it is never just about food, coaching, running, business, or anything else.  If I take the time to compete or get involved in something, than I am playing for keeps.  I will give it absolutely everything I have and am often far more intense than those around me.  My main opponent is always myself and the goal is to maximize my performance; nothing more.  Once it’s over, I can return to my normal, happy self but in the moment, I can’t help but be intense.  When you care, give it all you have because anything less is an insult. 

Some quotes I love. 

“What separates the elite is not their rise, but their response.  Never crown a king, team, or organization until the have been battle tested.” – Inky Johnson

“Children must be taught how to think, not what to think.” – Margaret Mead

“Keep chasing your goals whether you are alone, broke, tired, or scared.  Keep going.”

“The challenges you face introduce you to your strengths.” – Epictetus

“The greatest compliment I could ever receive as a father of my children is that they’re coachable.  That’s the single greatest skill set I could teach them – to listen, learn, and apply.” – Ryan Michler

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 22nd
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 15th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

A good reminder.  I spoke to a patient of mine this week that is a high level, sponsored skateboarder.  He mentioned to me that he’d recently gone to a large, national event and had placed very highly in a competition.  Also, he explained to me when he was there, he felt his competitive juices coming back to him because he was around high performers.  He told me how important this was to him because (humbly) he explained to me that normally, he is the highest performer within his circle which often leads to complacency.

I found this to be relevant and a good reminder.  Most people I know tend to do only a fraction of the things I do.  They think the things I do are crazy and many of them express to me, they wish they could do it themselves.  I could choose to feel great about that and tell myself that I am doing enough.   Instead, I seek out people that are doing more than me.  This changes my mindset from “I’m doing great” to “I need to do better.”  It is important to seek out people that motivate and inspire you to ask more of yourself.

Something important.  The competency – confidence loop is something I strongly believe in.  Competence involves training, practice and learning to build up a set of skills.  This is your set of basic skills.  However, as you begin to repeat these skills, it will build confidence. 

Confidence then leads to excitement and a desire to improve more and perform better.  Without becoming competent, you can never truly become confident.  Likewise, if you have great confidence but are not competent, you will eventually fail. 

As an example, when I graduated from chiropractic school, I was competent and considered one of the best in my class.  However, it took me using those skills daily for several years before I began to develop the confidence I have today.  If your confidence is low in an area, seek out ways to become better and more competent.  As this occurs, confidence will grow, and you will be able to flourish.

Something I often notice.  I have conversations with people all the time where they take a lot of time to explain to me how things used to be.  In other words, how wonderful things were at another time or how bad they were in childhood, after a loss of some kind, etc.  In either case, I am always struck by how much energy they exert into the past while ignoring the present.

An analogy I like to use is if you are driving your vehicle only looking in the rear-view mirror, good things are not coming your way.  We are all shaped by events in our past and we do not need to ignore them.  We should acknowledge them, use them for fuel or to make a new path, but also move past them.  If you are living in the past, you are burning all the fuel you need to move forward on things that can no longer be changed.  Look ahead, that’s where you’re going.

An analogy I think works.  A patient came to me for an adjustment the other day that I had seen one time, two years prior.  She got excellent relief from my treatment but was bothered that the problem returned two years later.  She asked, “Why does this keep coming back?”  This woman was not in good physical shape, admitted to doing no stretching or exercise, and ignored all the advice I provided to her at her one and only visit.  I get this regularly, so I take no offense but it’s a concept worth exploring.

A mechanic can fix an issue with your car if you allow them to do the proper work on it.  However, once you drive off the lot, it is up to you to maintain it.  If you don’t drive it for months on end, never change the oil, use bald tires, and cover up the check engine light with a piece of duct tape; the car will certainly develop further issues.  Conversely, if you care for you vehicle you will give it the best chance to remain in great repair.

Your body works the same way.  Whether it’s a chiropractic adjustment, massage, surgery, or anything else; there are no one shot-deal cures to any issues.  They can help but even those that work the best will require effort after the fact to maintain and/or prevent further episodes.  For example, if you get a knee surgery and don’t follow it up with the proper physical therapy or habits thereafter, you will develop issues down the line.  Your body will always require constant maintenance and care just like your car does.  If you provide it, you will be pleased with the result.  If you do not, you are almost certain to experience problems down the line.

Some quotes I love. 

“In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s, there are few.” – Shunryo Suzuki

“Pursue what is meaningful, not what is expedient.” – Jordan Peterson

“It’s easy to forget your own potential when you hang out with people who have given up on reaching theirs.  You need to level up your relationships if you want to level up your life.” – Dr. Josh Handt

“A man who is more concerned with being a good man than being good at being a man makes a very well-behaved slave.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 15th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 8th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

A show I love.  I’ve been watching a show on CNBC called “No Retreat.”  The show is hosted by Joe DeSena who is the founder of Spartan Race and has a history as a highly successful businessman with startups and Wall Street endeavors. 

The premise of the show is that he evaluates a business that needs help and identifies three specific areas of weakness that must be improved for the business to survive and thrive.  Then, he brings members of the business to “The Farm”, his enormous property in Vermont.  Here he will help reinforce business lessons across these three areas via some form of extreme physical challenge.

To some, this may sound odd but to me it is not.  Many of the lessons I use daily in life and business have come from the extreme training and events I have done.  When you allow yourself to be pushed past the brink of what you previously saw as possible, it can have a profound, positive impact on your behavior and etches lessons into your mind stronger than you might think possible. 

A concept I believe in.  “A-players” or your “A list” are people in your business and/or personal life that you should treasure.  In business, they are the people that pay full price, value your time, appreciate what you offer, and shout it to the world thereafter which leads to more business.  In your everyday life, they are people that uplift, motivate, and help you always seemingly at the ideal time.  A-players are always low maintenance and yet are invaluable. 

Not everyone in your life can or will be an A-player.  Therefore, when you have them you want to make sure you appreciate them and treat them as best you can.  Interestingly, these people rarely come with headaches.  Instead, it is the C or D list players that will bring you the most stress. 

I have different rules for my A-list than I do everyone else.  For these people, I always find a way to make time and am happy to offer them accommodations I would never offer to others.  Do everything you can to be an A-lister to others while also valuing anyone in your life that is on your A-list!

Something important.  I had a conversation recently with a chiropractor that explained to me how he does a great job of helping people, but the people he’s helped don’t send him a lot of referrals.  He explained how hard he works, how much he cares, and on and on. 

As he finished telling me this, I think he wanted me to tell him how unfair this was.  Instead, I told him that life will never hand you cookies or trophies for doing what you are supposed to do.  In this example, helping people is his job and when he does it, people are getting what they expected to begin with.

I feel things get much simpler when you commit yourself to the process of doing things to the best of your ability, and then let the chips fall where they may.  I have trained intensely for events that ended well and others that ended in heartbreak.  Some of my proudest successes with patients did not even elicit so much as a thank you, while other times I have helped someone with a simple issue at a single visit and they’ve gone on to refer dozens of people my way.  Control what you can, do not worry about getting credit for it, and eventually you are likely to be happy with the outcome.

Something that inspired me.  I watched a documentary on Netflix called “14 Peaks” about Nims Purja, a soldier from Nepal that set a goal to climb all 14 of the world’s mountains above 8,000 meters (over 26,000 feet!).  This had been accomplished by others previously and the quickest time it took to complete them all was nearly 8 years.  Nims made a goal to climb all 14 of them in only 7 months and he called it “Project Possible.”  To put this in perspective, after climbing Mount Everest, he would still have 13 remaining mountains of similar height to climb and summit.  These mountains claim lives each year and his goal was referred to by many as “trying to swim to the moon.” 

The documentary was amazing and then later I ordered his book which went into further detail called “Beyond Possible: One Man, Fourteen Peaks, and the Mountaineering Achievement of a Lifetime.”  His story inspired me because he went after a goal that people literally laughed at him for.  His path was not easy, but he always maintained a positive outlook and endeavored to do something unheard of. 

Some quotes I love. 

“Practice makes permanent.  The more reps you give to something, the more habitual it becomes.  What reps are you getting in today to replace the negative habits with more productive ones?  Comes down to one choice at a time.  Go win your next one.” – Dr. Josh Handt

“Pain is temporary. It may last for a minute, or an hour, or a day, or even a year.  But eventually, it will subside, and something else will take its place.  If I quit, however, it will last forever.” – Eric Thomas

“A wrong decision is better than indecision.” – Tony Soprano, ‘The Sopranos’.

“Someone else’s success does not mean a failure for you.” – Joe Rogan

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 8th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 1st

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

An important question.  Have you ever gotten upset at a customer service representative, a waiter/waitress, a business you frequented, etc.?  Certainly, you have.  Your emotion in these situations was the result of having an expectation of quality or responsibility that was not met to the standards you expected.  The question to ask yourself is whether you operate in this manner when it comes to yourself?  Do you give yourself a bad review or mark and then make a change or do you just brush it off? 

Personally, there are times when I don’t live up to my own expectations, meet a standard I’ve set, or plan or prepare as I know I should, and I don’t let myself off the hook.  In these instances, I am not interested in giving myself grace, because I know deep down I could and should have done better.  From there, I make corrections, but never let myself slide.  I think this is an important concept, if you are going to be critical of other people and things then you must be as tough on yourself.

Advice I recently gave.  I was talking to a young man recently about some troubles he’d been having.  Some of these issues were centered around disparaging words that had been said to him by some of his social circle at school.  I gave him some advice that I feel is important and worth sharing.

My belief is that you are either the type of person that can root others on and celebrate their successes or you are not.  There is no third option.  The people that cannot, will always find something about you, me, and everyone else to dislike.  We cannot let this affect us because it is more about them than anyone else.

Those that are excited for others’ successes are the people you want most in your life.  These people are confident in who they are and will never attempt to build themselves up by tearing others down.  People who are happy for others when they do well also usually do well themselves.  The next time someone says something that hurts or bothers you, ask yourself which of these two categories they fall into.

A workout I enjoyed.  Recently, I towed my two youngest children behind me in a bike seat.  I rode for a total of about three hours, and we stopped at a park, then for lunch, and finally at Crumbl Cookie so they could get a treat. 

I really enjoy times like this because it allows me to get in a good workout while involving the kids in a way that makes them happy.  We all get to enjoy nice weather, have fun, and make some nice memories with one another.  Having two older kids as well, I know how quickly these times go away, so I try to cherish them while I can!

Something that serves me well.  I was speaking to a patient last week that is running her first marathon.  Runners often use mantras to help keep themselves going and she asked if I have one that I use.  I told her that my mantra is simple, “I’m still in the fight.”

I will say this to myself throughout a race as a reminder that I’m still moving forward, enduring mentally, physically, and refusing to quit.  This keeps me from feeling sorry for myself or letting my mind wander too much.  I have also found this to be a great mantra at different times in my daily life.  If I encounter an issue in my personal life, with my businesses, coaching, or anything else; I just tell myself I am still in the fight and continue to persevere. 

Some quotes I love. 

“Cowards die many times before their death.  The valiant never taste death but once.” – Shakespeare (Julius Ceasar Act II, Sene II)

“Don’t be pushed around by the fears in your mind.  Be led by the dreams in your heart.” – Roy T. Bennett

“Stop low balling your business to satisfy cheap people.  They pay full price for Jordan’s and Michael Kors; they can pay you too.” – Wade Burdette

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
  • Interested in weight loss, more energy, enhanced performance and more?  Respond to this email and we can add you to Dr. Kenney’s email list for SAM Designer Health, his nutrition and exercise business!
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 1st
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – March 25th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

A lesson that has helped me.  When I was in my first two years of high school, my grandfather with whom I was extremely close, was battling bone cancer.  He was a proud and tough man, was a boxer in his younger years and knew everyone in the large town in which he lived.  Much of my personality comes from him and one lesson in particular has been extremely valuable to me.

Going through such a tough battle, my grandfather was counted out many times.  However, he loved gathering at the holidays with his family, so he would always set a goal to attend the next holiday gathering.  To do so, he had to endure great amounts of pain while showing courage and mental strength.

I have been in many tough situations in my life and often think back to this to keep me going.  I learned this lesson at a young age, but it took some time for me to learn to apply it properly.  The lesson it reinforced for me was to never give up and never forget your “why.”  When your why is strong enough, you can achieve and overcome far more than you ever dreamed. 

A trait I admire. Toughness is a trait that I truly admire. When I say that, you may have the idea that I’m referring to big muscles and physical prowess.  That can apply, but toughness to me goes far beyond the physical.  In my opinion, toughness is about mental strength, determination, and tenacity in the face of obstacles.

I like to feel I can identify toughness easily. Unfortunately, I do not see it as often as I’d like these days.  However, it is always interesting to me where it can be found.  Some of the truly toughest people I have encountered are women and/or mothers for example.  Toughness usually bares itself with a quiet and humbled resolve to keep going.  Many of the people whom I consider the toughest would likely never refer to themselves as such, but truly are.

Something worth trying.  Recently, I have been going through the process of evaluating various aspects of my life and asking myself what 3-5 things I could improve.  For example, I ask myself this question as a chiropractor, father, husband, athlete, coach, and more.   

The goal of this endeavor is not to become negative, but rather to look for avenues of improvement.  It’s been worth it for me to find small changes or additions I can make to improve myself.  The beauty of doing this is, you’re coming up with answers before you’re forced to.  You can identify ways to improve without being in an emotional or crisis state.  Give this a try, I promise it will be worth it!

Something I believe.  As a chiropractor, I am a believer that whenever possible you should seek out a cure to a problem rather than masking it.  This applies in many ways.  One way in particular is creating the best version of you possible.

This means that if you want more money, better relationships, whatever; you must produce the best version of yourself possible.  If you do that, those things will come more easily.  There is not an endeavor or situation you can name that would not benefit from you being the best version of yourself mentally, physically, emotionally, and more.  Become the best you possible mentally, physically, emotionally, spiritually, etc. and you will be thrilled at what it leads to in your life. 

Some quotes I love. 

“What we fear doing most is usually what we most need to do.” – Tim Ferriss

“Only the fittest of the fittest shall survive, stay alive.” – Bob Marley, Could You Be Loved

“Sometimes you have to get knocked down lower than you have ever been, to stand up taller than you ever were.”

“When setting out on a journey, do not seek advice from those who have never left home.” – Rumi

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – March 25th
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