All posts tagged: challenge yourself

Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 17th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

Something I think about often.  Years ago, I read a book about running and the author told a story that has stuck with me from that day forward.  Frank Shorter was a gold medal, Olympic marathon runner in the 70’s.  The author of this book was with Frank as they watched a group of runners training.  One of the more talented runners slightly cut across a corner as he was completing a workout.  When Frank saw this, he said to the author “he’ll never be a champion, champions never cut corners.” 

Every single time I come around a corner on a run I think of this.  It also reinforces one of my beliefs which is “how you do anything is how you’ll do everything.”  In other words, if you take shortcuts, you will do so in all aspects of your life.  Conversely, when you give even the smallest tasks your full attention and effort, you are training yourself to do that in life.

Some thoughts on courage.  I got into an interesting talk about courage the other day with a patient of mine.  I liked what she had to say, and she enjoyed my thoughts and asked me to share them in my 5 Spot.

Most people think about showing courage as a very cinematic event – an act is performed; everyone cheers and it’s an instant lovefest.  It would be great if this were the case but it’s far more likely that when you show courage you will be going against what is accepted or common.  Therefore, you may be ridiculed, mocked, or disliked for what you’ve done because it challenges the actions or beliefs of those around you.  As a result, true courage is probably easier to spot after the fact when times or events have had time to unfold.  What is considered “wrong” today, is courage later. 

I believe everyone has the capacity to be courageous though it is found in short supply these days.  Courage does not need to come from anything elaborate or someone special.  It can be something simple and can be performed by any of us.  A great example of this would be Rosa Parks who decided she would not move when she was asked.  Displaying courage is crucial, make sure you are acting accordingly. 

A lesson I’ve learned from running that is crucial in life.  Logging as many miles as I have over the years, I can tell you that not every run is created equal.  Some days things progress effortlessly, others feel as if each mile takes forever.  On the tough days, I often experience a strong desire to simply stop running and rest.  Many times, I have given in and done just that.  What I notice on these days though, is once you stop, you begin to stop more frequently, you think you’re more tired than you are, you need more rest, etc. 

The lesson this has taught me, is to keep going when it gets tough.  If I do this, I find that powering through a challenging period gives me strength on the other side.  It changes my momentum and before I know it, I feel great.  It’s as if I needed to prove to my mind, that my body was stronger than it thought, and then it gives up telling me to stop.  The exact same run can have two completely different outcomes in performance simply by staying strong during a few tough minutes.  Life is the same – if you don’t want to have to start over, than don’t stop – you’ll get stronger, and your results will be better!

A type of person to limit in your life.  There is a type of person that I often refer to as a “time hog.”  The hallmark signs of such a person are negativity, constantly talking only about themselves, no respect for your time, and no desire to learn or ask about you.  Most often, it’s as if these types of people will have 20 minutes worth of material they want to get out.  They will do so whether you’re interested or not and regardless of whether it’s a convenient time for you.  Most people that are time hogs may not even know they are, they have just become trained to act in that fashion and don’t realize how they are perceived.

Most of us have a desire to be nice, kind and caring so it can become challenging to deal with such a person.  My advice is to do whatever you must to limit your exposure to such people.  Not because they are bad people, simply because they will drain your energy and so much of your time.  I know people like this (patients and people in my life), and I am always polite but if you were to rewind our interaction and watch it, you’d notice I got away (escaped!) quickly.  Try not to be a “time hog” and certainly do your best to avoid them.

Some quotes I love.

“The freedoms you surrender today are the freedoms your grandchildren will never know existed.”

“Obsessed is just a word the lazy use to describe the dedicated.” – Russel Warren

“People will summarize your life in once sentence – pick it now.” – John C. Maxwell

“Life will only change when you become more committed to your dreams rather than your comfort zone.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 17th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 3rd

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

A good reminder.  On Sunday, I had to put down my beloved dog that I rescued 9 years ago.  He had a neurological condition that had been progressively worsening and last Thursday when I carried him outside to go to the bathroom, instead of wanting to come back inside quickly like always, he crawled under the shade of a tree and wanted to stay outside.  I felt as though this was a message directly to me telling me that it was “time.”

Ultimately, I had to make the call to put him down and it was a reminder to me of how sometimes being a leader is about making the calls you don’t want to.  In this instance, I needed to consider what was best for him rather than what would be better or less challenging for myself.  When people look to you as a leader, you will eventually be forced to make difficult, unpopular and/or agonizing decisions.  Ultimately, leaders would rather make those decisions than trust someone else to do it for them.

How I handle grief.  Saturday was the anniversary of my brother in law’s (and best friend) death last year.  Then Sunday I had to put my dog down.  Both events were incredibly sad and made even more so when seeing my family upset.  So, what did I do to handle it?

First, I make sure to get back into a routine.  After difficulties in life, we tend to drift away from our good habits.  We eat poorly, stop exercising, lose touch with friends, etc.  On Saturday, I did the “Murph” workout in honor of my brother-in-law and on Sunday and Monday I made sure to go for runs and exercise.  Did I feel like doing this?  No.  However, the exertion did help alleviate a lot of stress and tension and helped me cope with everything easier.  Next, I let my emotions go.  I am typically not someone that cries from sadness, but I did quite a bit of it on Sunday and Monday.  It’s far better to let all of that out and allow your body that release.  When you are hit with a tough time, don’t be afraid to be emotional but make sure you don’t allow yourself to fall into bad patterns.

Something I loved.  On Saturday, my oldest son had his first freshman football game and played all but about 10 total plays.  He was doing everything except working the concession stand and was understandably exhausted after the game.  One of his teammates and good friends did not get an opportunity to play much and texted him 2 hours after the game asking if he wanted to go to a field and practice.

It was 30 minutes away and my son asked if I would take him.  He commented that it was probably the last thing I felt like doing but I said I would.  The reason I was happy to do so was because I thought it was admirable for both boys to want to go back and get better.  My son could have easily said no to his friend because he was tired and played a lot but chose not to.  His friend could have sat at home and complained that he didn’t get playing time but instead decided to work on getting better.  Anytime someone has the desire to work harder and improve their performance in anything, it should be encouraged.   

What are your thoughts on the things being imposed on kids due to COVID?  I’ve gotten this question often over the past couple of weeks.  Normally, I refrain from talking about COVID in my 5 Spots because it gets too exhausting and boring but when it comes to kids, I felt it was important to comment. 

My first thought is that when it comes to anything about your child’s health, I would encourage you to do your own research and know your stuff.  Do not listen to the news, me, your pediatrician, neighbors, family, teachers, or anyone else as your sole source of information.  Take nothing for granted and make the time to compare the narratives to the evidence, learn about contraindications, exercise common sense, and more.  Second, adults should not need, want, or expect any child to protect them or their health.  We have a duty to help them and should pursue only the avenues that do so.    

Some quotes I love.

“First, they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out—because I was not a socialist.  Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out— because I was not a trade unionist.  Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—because I was not a Jew.  Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.” – Martin Niemoller

“It’s common now to mistake defending someone’s right to say things, with agreeing with those things.  If you don’t support free speech for people you disagree with, you don’t support free speech.” – Ricky Gervais

“Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.” – Virginia Woolf

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – September 3rd
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 27th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

An analogy I like.  I listened to a podcast the other day and the guest compared the freedoms we enjoy in this country to a buffet.  I think this analogy works for a few reasons. 

First, just like a buffet, there will be some things that really appeal to you and others you won’t like.  Second, the ability for you to select what you do and do not want to eat is crucial.  Vegetarians wouldn’t want to be told to eat meat, while others may not want to touch vegetables, etc.  In either case, the point is, we shouldn’t limit choices based on someone else’s preferences.  Finally, if someone were monitoring the buffet and telling you what you should be eating and why, it would be a dangerous precedent.  Maybe the person telling you to eat the beef owns cattle.  Perhaps the person encouraging you to eat the desserts sells a weight loss drug that you might find useful after years of sugar.  The point is, if there are choices seemingly available to you but someone is there to make sure you only pick certain things, it’s not a buffet; it’s a prison cafeteria.  Shutting a buffet down when you see people making choices you would not isn’t cool, freedoms work the same way. 

Something I believe in.  I had a new patient last week that came in (while I had a chiropractic student shadowing me) and was incredibly forthright in what he told me.  He gave me information on how he was feeling but also was candid as to things he’d done wrong and what steps he’d taken to remedy those actions.

This was an example of something I believe in strongly – people that are honest, humble and want to change; have already won half the battle.  On the road to change, we are usually our own worst enemy.  We make excuses, we get embarrassed, and/or we blame people and circumstances for our shortcomings.  Those who take ownership over their actions, admit that they could use help and are willing to do what is necessary to get there; will always succeed. 

A good reminder.  My dog is an older boxer that is sadly near the end of his life.  One night this week I went to bed and after about an hour of sleep I heard him barking which he rarely does.  I came down to check on him to see what he needed.  I adjusted him and gave him a treat, but he was still not relaxing.  At this point, I understood that he was barking because he didn’t want to be alone downstairs and, in his condition, he was unable to come and find me.  I moved his bed next to the couch, petted him until he fell asleep and spent the night next to him.

This experience with my dog was a good reminder to me of a lesson in life.  Sometimes the best thing you can do for someone is to just simply be there for them – listen, hold their hand, give them a hug, show them kindness, etc.  We can’t solve every issue, even though we’d like to.  At times, the best we can do is just be there for someone, so they don’t feel alone.

A trick I have relied on many times.  Have you ever had to go to work (or somewhere else) after a fight with your spouse, getting bad news about something, or feeling like there is something you’d much rather be thinking about than work?  This happens to all of us at some point and can be difficult to deal with. 

What I have found effective over the years is compartmentalizing.  When I get to work, I know my patients need me to be on my game.  I must give them the courtesy of my full attention and provide the very care possible.  If I am distracted about something this cannot happen.  Therefore, if I have something on my mind, I tell myself it must go into “the box” and I compartmentalize by imaging putting my trouble into a steel box and locking it away.  It doesn’t mean I am ignoring the problem or not acknowledging its existence.  Rather, it is an act or prioritization – I make myself focus completely on the task at hand without worrying about anything else.  Once I have finished what I need to, I allow myself to reopen that box and deal with whatever I must.  Years ago, as my first marriage was falling apart, I had to do this on an almost daily basis to get through a workday.  Last year when my brother-in-law died, I also had to use this technique.  Your mind cannot be in two places at once so use “the box” to help you focus and prioritize better.

Some quotes I love.

“The further a society drifts from truth, the more it will hate those who speak it.” – George Orwell

“The dream is free, the hustle is sold separately.”

“What the superior man seeks is in himself; what the small man seeks is in others.” – Confucius

“Civil disobedience becomes a sacred duty when the state becomes lawless or corrupt.” – Mahatma Ghandi

“If you tell the truth, you don’t have to remember anything.” – Mark Twain

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 27th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 20th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

A concept I took from coaching that I apply to life.  Years ago, as I was beginning to coach, I happened to run across the saying “you are either coaching it or allowing it.”  Quite simply, this means that you are either encouraging a certain behavior or it is permeating because you have failed to address the problem.  If my players are not hustling, arguing, not following instructions, etc. then it is my fault either because I taught it to them or allowed it to continue. There are few situations that can’t be brought back to the simple question of “am I coaching this or allowing it?”

It is also excellent advice for everyday life.  If you are around negative people, then you taught them to be that way or failed to get away from them.  If you’re not meeting your goals and are unhappy, you either want it that way or are unwilling to do what it takes to get to a better place.  With everything you do, you are either manifesting something or letting it happen.

Something I do not like to hear and what I prefer to do instead.  “It’s really tough so I’m…”  I hear a version of this all the time, and it usually begins with a desired outcome or behavior and then is followed by an excuse taking the form of “but it’s hard.”  We’ve all done this, but the reality is that almost anything worth doing or achieving will be hard.  I’m yet to read the biography of someone that talks about how easy their life was on the way to success or triumph. 

Rather than spend time explaining and focusing on why something is so hard, deconstruct it for yourself.  What are the hurdles?  How can you overcome them?  What would be a solid first step to solving the issue?  I find that taking these simple steps changes something that seems too hard or overwhelming and feeds you confidence that you might just be able to succeed after all!

I concept I take from my athletic career and use regularly.  When I played football in high school and college, I learned the term “playing hurt.”  This doesn’t mean that you play through serious injuries but refers to getting out there when you aren’t at 100%.  Maybe you’re sore, slightly hobbled, feeling sick, unmotivated, don’t feel like being there, etc.  but you still go and play.

I have found this invaluable in life as well.  My job is to help my patients who are not feeling well.  As a result, I never miss work unless it’s for an event or vacation.  When my life has gone through turbulent times, haven’t felt well, have been in physical pain, you name it, I have still been there, and my patients never know because I refuse to show them, I’m not at full strength.  I use this in other aspects of life is well, but the point is, most of us are rarely at 100% and there will always be reasons to quit, skip, or avoid our responsibilities.  The best policy is to suit up and show up unless you absolutely cannot, and those instances are extremely rare!

A great practice to either begin or continue.  I am a huge proponent of alone time.  It is not because I want a break from my family or patients, merely because the time alone allows me the time to get myself properly primed for the world and situations around me.  Sometimes I take this alone time before anyone is awake, sometimes while running, other times just pulling weeds in my yard.  Regardless of how I go about it, I take some time to think through issues, prepare for things of importance and reflect on things I can improve.  Make sure you find some time for yourself in a day so that you can do the same!

Something I told my sons recently.  My oldest son is on the high school football team.  One of the players has a form of autism (this is my diagnosis based on what I’ve seen and know).  At a practice last week, he came up and began talking to me and my two younger sons.  He was very kind and polite and was especially nice to my 3-year-old.  I really found him to be a good kid.  From a distance, I noticed a few of the other players kind of mocking him and at their game the next day, they chanted his name but not in a way that I felt was meant to support him, but rather as if he were the butt of the joke.  I was mad and upset.  My son had no role in it (and was unaware it even happened because he was playing so much, plus he wouldn’t anyway) but I shared my feelings with him and his brother. 

I told him that anyone that would make fun of someone or mock someone like that was inherently insecure and weak themselves.  These are never the type of people you want around you because they are always the first to leave when any challenge arises and will follow the pack regardless of whether it is right or not.  Furthermore, I expressed my admiration for the young man who was willing to show up with no friends on the team and play an incredibly physical sport, all with a smile on his face.  That type of person is someone I want around because they are strong in the face of adversity and never abandon the people they care about.  Most of the toughest and most successful people I know would never take the time to put someone else down but will always take the time to lift someone else up.  Be that type of person.

Some quotes I love.

“I just told my wife “I’m sorry we have to raise children in these dystopian times.”  She recalled a quote she read just today: “Never feel sorry for raising dragon slayers in a time where there are actual dragons.”  – someone sent this to me, not sure where it’s from

“The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance; it is the illusion of knowledge.” – Stephen Hawking

“When the whole world is running toward a cliff, he who is running in the opposite direction appears to have lost his mind.” – C.S. Lewis

“Nobody is coming to save you.  So, save yourself.” – Ray Care

“If you can’t win in an imperfect circumstance, you are not good enough to win it.  If everything has to be perfect, then you have to get better.” – Kyle Dake

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – August 20th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – July 30th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

A concept I believe in.  Competing in ultramarathons as I do; I am often running and alone with my thoughts for hours at a time (as many as 30 in my longest races).  What I’ve learned is that your mind is your biggest strength and your greatest weakness.  To maximize strength and minimize weakness, you must avoid negotiating with your own mind. 

The reason for this, is that your mind has a built-in protective mechanism.  When things get tough or challenging, your mind will do all it can to get you to stop and seek comfort.  It will tell you you’ve done enough, it really doesn’t matter, you’re too tired, you could get hurt, etc., but it’s all nonsense.  Conversely, if you can use your mind to think positively then you will find yourself pushing past your previous perceived limits and shattering goals you didn’t know you could.  Both outcomes are always possible, the biggest variable is your mind.  The mind is a tricky thing so be aware that anytime you start doing something hard, your mind will begin trying to convince you to stop.  Don’t negotiate with terrorists and that includes your own mind!

Can you get adjusted too much?  I suppose this is theoretically possible under the right circumstances though extremely unlikely.  Even in chiropractic school when we practiced on one another so often (and weren’t yet good at doing so!) it never became a problem.  My receptionists usually ask to be adjusted daily (their choice not mine) and notice excellent improvements as opposed to more sporadic care.  When I’ve worked with other chiropractors, I usually received daily adjustments because of the benefits it provides me. 

In my experience, when people are getting adjusted even somewhat more frequently, they begin to have less vertebrae that are misaligned and soon need fewer adjustments to maintain a healthy spine.  Each individual case is different but well-performed adjustments would be difficult to over-do. 

A type of workout I’ve been enjoying.  With my two youngest children being 3 and (almost) 1 years of age, I spend a decent amount of time in parks.  This week, I’ve been taking them to the parks before 7am when it’s relatively cool outside.  As I’m there, I play with them and will work out around them as well for fun.  This includes pullups, dips, pushups, abdominal and core exercises, jump squats and more.  It’s enjoyable for me, the little ones think it’s funny and mimic what I do.  This plants a seed in their young minds that exercise is important and enjoyable while allowing me to exercise with my kiddos in a unique way.

An Interesting observation.  I had several random conversations this week that brought about a similar theme.  Though the details varied, the essence of each conversation was “I’m really stressed so I’ve been making bad choices physically, mentally and nutritionally.”  Each person went on to explain in detail why this was the case.

What interested me was that no one ever says that they’re too stressed to do the right things but often use this as an excuse to do the wrong things.  Have you ever heard “I’ve been feeling down so I started exercising and eating better to help myself out”?  Likely not.  None of us like to feel anxious, stressed, etc., but doing things we know are wrong and that don’t benefit us is certain to only worsen the problem.  Things won’t always be perfect but if we’re trying to get through a tough time and we know bad choices will make it even tougher, we should avoid them. 

Some quotes I love.

“The worst thing you can do is nothing.” – Terry Pratchett

“I’ve found that the areas that I complain about the most are directly tied to the places where I need firmer boundaries.” – Nedra Glover Tawwab

“Don’t punish yourself for making poor decisions but be relentless on yourself for standing still.” – Tom Bilyeu

“All that matters is how you feel about yourself when you are by yourself.” – Tom Bilyeu

“I always think more of a man who keeps his word and less of a man who doesn’t.  Integrity is a simple litmus test and universal principle of trust, credibility, and influence.” – Ryan Michler

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – July 30th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – March 26th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share some of the experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant in some way.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life. 

A workout I enjoyed.  Last weekend I wanted to come up with a new challenge for my sons, so I took them on a hike during which we all had to carry weight to make it more difficult.  I wore a 40-pound weight vest while carrying 25-pound weights in each hand, my oldest son carried a 15-pound weight in each hand and my middle son pushed my youngest son in a jogging stroller with a 10-pound weight in the stroller as well. We went up a large hill for 1 ½ miles and then came back down.  Even better, the boys wanted to get Chick Fil-a breakfast afterwards which ends at 10:30am so they had to hustle the whole time!

It was a challenging workout for all of us, but we loved it.  I do these types of things with my kids to develop camaraderie while also teaching them that doing hard things is not something to be feared but should be embraced.  Anytime we do something like this they always finish and are so proud they got through it.  The workouts we’ve done that were the toughest on them (and me) are usually remembered the most fondly actually.

Do you do anything to help with feet or ankles?  Yes!  I’ve been able to help hundreds of patients over the years by addressing the alignment of certain bones in the feet and ankles.  Often, they’ll have a misdiagnosis or a history of ineffective treatments for something involving the foot and ankle and after examining it, I will detect improper motion of certain joints.  Most commonly, I will see misalignments of the talus bone (square bone that sits between the two lower leg bones) and/or the calcaneus (heel bone).  When these bones are misaligned, the normal biomechanics of the foot and ankle go out the window causing pain, lack or mobility and over-compensation of the muscles and ligaments.  There is often no specific inciting event to cause this, it just happens gradually.  Re-aligning these bones restores function to the joints and allows them to quickly heel.  This is not a cure-all for all foot or ankle pain, but thankfully I am very often able to help.

An interesting interaction and analogy.  Last week I had a mom come in with her teenager.  The mom mentioned to me that her daughter was having some pain and that based on her age it wasn’t “normal.”  I had seen the teenager once previously about a year ago for her only chiropractic visit ever and so I asked both mom and daughter some follow up questions to better understand the situation.  As it turns out the teenager does almost no physical activity (no sports, nothing at home) and sits most of the day on devices.  The mom acknowledged that this wasn’t good but seemed to think that because the teen had been adjusted once and was young, that pain should never be an issue.

The analogy I used to explain the faulty logic in these assumptions was this – if a teenager had one dentist appointment in their lifetime and did no brushing or flossing on their own, would we expect the teeth to be healthy?  Of course not.  The spine is no different.  Regardless of age, if you’re not physically active and having at least some form of care for your spine, it won’t be healthy and a sign of that is likely to be pain.  Poor habits lead to poor results at any age.

“How do you handle it when patients don’t listen to your recommendations?”  I got this one from a young doctor this week.  My answer was that when I give a recommendation – for a course of care, type of adjustment, a supplement to take, a question to ask their doctor, a referral to another type of provider, etc. I do so with pure intentions.  These are suggestions I’m giving based upon my experience and concern for the patient.  It is never based on finances or any motive that doesn’t directly serve the patient’s best interest.  Therefore, if my recommendations are not followed it does not bother me or hurt my feelings or pride.  I will never know the reasons a patient does or does not do something, and many will have nothing to do with me.  I try to do what I think will help them and if they follow it, great.  If not, I know I tried to do right by them and that’s ultimately all I can do.

Some quotes I love.

“You are what you do, not what you’ll say you do.”

“The secret of happiness, you see, is not found in seeking more but in developing the capacity to enjoy less.” – Socrates

“It doesn’t take many words to tell the truth.” – Sitting Bull

“The sign of a good doctor should be how many patients he can get OFF medications, not how many people he puts ON medications.” – Dr. Jeff Barke, MD

“Cutting corners, shortcuts, and taking the “easy road” is disrespectful to all of those that believe in you.  When you cheat yourself, you cheat them also.” – Lennox Lewis

“Fear is a force that sharpens your senses.” – Marcus Luttrell

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com and go to “blog”
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – March 26th
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6 Reasons to challenge yourself

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Later this week I’ll compete in an ultra marathon, one of my most challenging events yet to date. As the race approaches, it has gotten me thinking about why I like to compete and why I think it’s beneficial for others to do so – whether it’s a small local event or something much tougher. Today I’ll highlight 6 reasons you should consider signing up for something in the future.

1. Everyone needs a goal. Having a goal is good but having an actual date on the calendar you need to be ready for is even better because it will keep you from slacking.

About a year ago after not running longer than 3 miles or competing in any races for 2 years I went on a 7 mile trail run. Within 3 days of that run I had signed up for 3 races including a 24 hour event. I realized on that run how badly I missed having a goal to shoot for.

2. Begin down a healthier path. Once you sign up for an event you’ll notice you’re more willing to make healthier changes. These may include changing how you eat and drink, how you think, ridding yourself of bad habits, committing to getting out of pain or any number of other things. Many of the most profound changes start with a simple catalyst.

I’ve been studying exercise, nutrition and better ways to care for the human body for a long time and some of the most valuable information I’ve obtained came while preparing for an event.

3. Raises training intensity. Whether you’re looking to shed some pounds or are an Olympic hopeful, having something to train for will instantly make your workouts more intense and beneficial.

I’ve had many days where I only feel like running or training for a short time and want to call it an early day. However, with an event looming I always find the will to keep going because every workout seems to matter more.

4. Inspire others. Everyday people don’t often think of themselves as inspirational however it’s likely that many of your friends, family and co-workers will identify more with you than anyone else. Enter an event and I promise you that you’ll motivate someone else to do the same.

A big inspiration for me is seeing how excited my children get when I finish an event and the questions they ask me about it. Setting an example for them is important to me.

5. Stretch your comfort zone. Competing in a strenuous event (that term is relative to the individual) forces you to face adversity both mentally and physically. Successfully dealing with that adversity during a race will carry over into your everyday life and make you more adept at handling challenges.

Being cold, tired and uncomfortable in my races has made me more comfortable whenever I encounter obstacles in my personal or business life which has made a tremendous difference for me.

6. Sense of accomplishment. Confidence is king. One thing that can quickly build confidence is accomplishing a goal. Signing up for a race or event (especially one out of your comfort zone) and then completing it will create confidence and momentum in other aspects of your life.

Calling upon recent athletic successes continues to make me confident and leads me to achieve loftier goals in my personal and business endeavors.

Dr. Kenney has won multiple awards for “Best Chiropractor” and specializes in motivating and helping patients achieve their goals of better health and pain relief. For more information please visit www.NewBodyChiro.com, find us on Facebook (New Body Chiropractic & Wellness Center) or call (303) 347-9906.

Matt Kenney6 Reasons to challenge yourself
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