All posts tagged: motivational quotes

Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 15th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

A good reminder.  I spoke to a patient of mine this week that is a high level, sponsored skateboarder.  He mentioned to me that he’d recently gone to a large, national event and had placed very highly in a competition.  Also, he explained to me when he was there, he felt his competitive juices coming back to him because he was around high performers.  He told me how important this was to him because (humbly) he explained to me that normally, he is the highest performer within his circle which often leads to complacency.

I found this to be relevant and a good reminder.  Most people I know tend to do only a fraction of the things I do.  They think the things I do are crazy and many of them express to me, they wish they could do it themselves.  I could choose to feel great about that and tell myself that I am doing enough.   Instead, I seek out people that are doing more than me.  This changes my mindset from “I’m doing great” to “I need to do better.”  It is important to seek out people that motivate and inspire you to ask more of yourself.

Something important.  The competency – confidence loop is something I strongly believe in.  Competence involves training, practice and learning to build up a set of skills.  This is your set of basic skills.  However, as you begin to repeat these skills, it will build confidence. 

Confidence then leads to excitement and a desire to improve more and perform better.  Without becoming competent, you can never truly become confident.  Likewise, if you have great confidence but are not competent, you will eventually fail. 

As an example, when I graduated from chiropractic school, I was competent and considered one of the best in my class.  However, it took me using those skills daily for several years before I began to develop the confidence I have today.  If your confidence is low in an area, seek out ways to become better and more competent.  As this occurs, confidence will grow, and you will be able to flourish.

Something I often notice.  I have conversations with people all the time where they take a lot of time to explain to me how things used to be.  In other words, how wonderful things were at another time or how bad they were in childhood, after a loss of some kind, etc.  In either case, I am always struck by how much energy they exert into the past while ignoring the present.

An analogy I like to use is if you are driving your vehicle only looking in the rear-view mirror, good things are not coming your way.  We are all shaped by events in our past and we do not need to ignore them.  We should acknowledge them, use them for fuel or to make a new path, but also move past them.  If you are living in the past, you are burning all the fuel you need to move forward on things that can no longer be changed.  Look ahead, that’s where you’re going.

An analogy I think works.  A patient came to me for an adjustment the other day that I had seen one time, two years prior.  She got excellent relief from my treatment but was bothered that the problem returned two years later.  She asked, “Why does this keep coming back?”  This woman was not in good physical shape, admitted to doing no stretching or exercise, and ignored all the advice I provided to her at her one and only visit.  I get this regularly, so I take no offense but it’s a concept worth exploring.

A mechanic can fix an issue with your car if you allow them to do the proper work on it.  However, once you drive off the lot, it is up to you to maintain it.  If you don’t drive it for months on end, never change the oil, use bald tires, and cover up the check engine light with a piece of duct tape; the car will certainly develop further issues.  Conversely, if you care for you vehicle you will give it the best chance to remain in great repair.

Your body works the same way.  Whether it’s a chiropractic adjustment, massage, surgery, or anything else; there are no one shot-deal cures to any issues.  They can help but even those that work the best will require effort after the fact to maintain and/or prevent further episodes.  For example, if you get a knee surgery and don’t follow it up with the proper physical therapy or habits thereafter, you will develop issues down the line.  Your body will always require constant maintenance and care just like your car does.  If you provide it, you will be pleased with the result.  If you do not, you are almost certain to experience problems down the line.

Some quotes I love. 

“In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s, there are few.” – Shunryo Suzuki

“Pursue what is meaningful, not what is expedient.” – Jordan Peterson

“It’s easy to forget your own potential when you hang out with people who have given up on reaching theirs.  You need to level up your relationships if you want to level up your life.” – Dr. Josh Handt

“A man who is more concerned with being a good man than being good at being a man makes a very well-behaved slave.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 15th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 8th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

A show I love.  I’ve been watching a show on CNBC called “No Retreat.”  The show is hosted by Joe DeSena who is the founder of Spartan Race and has a history as a highly successful businessman with startups and Wall Street endeavors. 

The premise of the show is that he evaluates a business that needs help and identifies three specific areas of weakness that must be improved for the business to survive and thrive.  Then, he brings members of the business to “The Farm”, his enormous property in Vermont.  Here he will help reinforce business lessons across these three areas via some form of extreme physical challenge.

To some, this may sound odd but to me it is not.  Many of the lessons I use daily in life and business have come from the extreme training and events I have done.  When you allow yourself to be pushed past the brink of what you previously saw as possible, it can have a profound, positive impact on your behavior and etches lessons into your mind stronger than you might think possible. 

A concept I believe in.  “A-players” or your “A list” are people in your business and/or personal life that you should treasure.  In business, they are the people that pay full price, value your time, appreciate what you offer, and shout it to the world thereafter which leads to more business.  In your everyday life, they are people that uplift, motivate, and help you always seemingly at the ideal time.  A-players are always low maintenance and yet are invaluable. 

Not everyone in your life can or will be an A-player.  Therefore, when you have them you want to make sure you appreciate them and treat them as best you can.  Interestingly, these people rarely come with headaches.  Instead, it is the C or D list players that will bring you the most stress. 

I have different rules for my A-list than I do everyone else.  For these people, I always find a way to make time and am happy to offer them accommodations I would never offer to others.  Do everything you can to be an A-lister to others while also valuing anyone in your life that is on your A-list!

Something important.  I had a conversation recently with a chiropractor that explained to me how he does a great job of helping people, but the people he’s helped don’t send him a lot of referrals.  He explained how hard he works, how much he cares, and on and on. 

As he finished telling me this, I think he wanted me to tell him how unfair this was.  Instead, I told him that life will never hand you cookies or trophies for doing what you are supposed to do.  In this example, helping people is his job and when he does it, people are getting what they expected to begin with.

I feel things get much simpler when you commit yourself to the process of doing things to the best of your ability, and then let the chips fall where they may.  I have trained intensely for events that ended well and others that ended in heartbreak.  Some of my proudest successes with patients did not even elicit so much as a thank you, while other times I have helped someone with a simple issue at a single visit and they’ve gone on to refer dozens of people my way.  Control what you can, do not worry about getting credit for it, and eventually you are likely to be happy with the outcome.

Something that inspired me.  I watched a documentary on Netflix called “14 Peaks” about Nims Purja, a soldier from Nepal that set a goal to climb all 14 of the world’s mountains above 8,000 meters (over 26,000 feet!).  This had been accomplished by others previously and the quickest time it took to complete them all was nearly 8 years.  Nims made a goal to climb all 14 of them in only 7 months and he called it “Project Possible.”  To put this in perspective, after climbing Mount Everest, he would still have 13 remaining mountains of similar height to climb and summit.  These mountains claim lives each year and his goal was referred to by many as “trying to swim to the moon.” 

The documentary was amazing and then later I ordered his book which went into further detail called “Beyond Possible: One Man, Fourteen Peaks, and the Mountaineering Achievement of a Lifetime.”  His story inspired me because he went after a goal that people literally laughed at him for.  His path was not easy, but he always maintained a positive outlook and endeavored to do something unheard of. 

Some quotes I love. 

“Practice makes permanent.  The more reps you give to something, the more habitual it becomes.  What reps are you getting in today to replace the negative habits with more productive ones?  Comes down to one choice at a time.  Go win your next one.” – Dr. Josh Handt

“Pain is temporary. It may last for a minute, or an hour, or a day, or even a year.  But eventually, it will subside, and something else will take its place.  If I quit, however, it will last forever.” – Eric Thomas

“A wrong decision is better than indecision.” – Tony Soprano, ‘The Sopranos’.

“Someone else’s success does not mean a failure for you.” – Joe Rogan

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 8th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 1st

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

An important question.  Have you ever gotten upset at a customer service representative, a waiter/waitress, a business you frequented, etc.?  Certainly, you have.  Your emotion in these situations was the result of having an expectation of quality or responsibility that was not met to the standards you expected.  The question to ask yourself is whether you operate in this manner when it comes to yourself?  Do you give yourself a bad review or mark and then make a change or do you just brush it off? 

Personally, there are times when I don’t live up to my own expectations, meet a standard I’ve set, or plan or prepare as I know I should, and I don’t let myself off the hook.  In these instances, I am not interested in giving myself grace, because I know deep down I could and should have done better.  From there, I make corrections, but never let myself slide.  I think this is an important concept, if you are going to be critical of other people and things then you must be as tough on yourself.

Advice I recently gave.  I was talking to a young man recently about some troubles he’d been having.  Some of these issues were centered around disparaging words that had been said to him by some of his social circle at school.  I gave him some advice that I feel is important and worth sharing.

My belief is that you are either the type of person that can root others on and celebrate their successes or you are not.  There is no third option.  The people that cannot, will always find something about you, me, and everyone else to dislike.  We cannot let this affect us because it is more about them than anyone else.

Those that are excited for others’ successes are the people you want most in your life.  These people are confident in who they are and will never attempt to build themselves up by tearing others down.  People who are happy for others when they do well also usually do well themselves.  The next time someone says something that hurts or bothers you, ask yourself which of these two categories they fall into.

A workout I enjoyed.  Recently, I towed my two youngest children behind me in a bike seat.  I rode for a total of about three hours, and we stopped at a park, then for lunch, and finally at Crumbl Cookie so they could get a treat. 

I really enjoy times like this because it allows me to get in a good workout while involving the kids in a way that makes them happy.  We all get to enjoy nice weather, have fun, and make some nice memories with one another.  Having two older kids as well, I know how quickly these times go away, so I try to cherish them while I can!

Something that serves me well.  I was speaking to a patient last week that is running her first marathon.  Runners often use mantras to help keep themselves going and she asked if I have one that I use.  I told her that my mantra is simple, “I’m still in the fight.”

I will say this to myself throughout a race as a reminder that I’m still moving forward, enduring mentally, physically, and refusing to quit.  This keeps me from feeling sorry for myself or letting my mind wander too much.  I have also found this to be a great mantra at different times in my daily life.  If I encounter an issue in my personal life, with my businesses, coaching, or anything else; I just tell myself I am still in the fight and continue to persevere. 

Some quotes I love. 

“Cowards die many times before their death.  The valiant never taste death but once.” – Shakespeare (Julius Ceasar Act II, Sene II)

“Don’t be pushed around by the fears in your mind.  Be led by the dreams in your heart.” – Roy T. Bennett

“Stop low balling your business to satisfy cheap people.  They pay full price for Jordan’s and Michael Kors; they can pay you too.” – Wade Burdette

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
  • Interested in weight loss, more energy, enhanced performance and more?  Respond to this email and we can add you to Dr. Kenney’s email list for SAM Designer Health, his nutrition and exercise business!
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – April 1st
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – March 25th

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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot

On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

A lesson that has helped me.  When I was in my first two years of high school, my grandfather with whom I was extremely close, was battling bone cancer.  He was a proud and tough man, was a boxer in his younger years and knew everyone in the large town in which he lived.  Much of my personality comes from him and one lesson in particular has been extremely valuable to me.

Going through such a tough battle, my grandfather was counted out many times.  However, he loved gathering at the holidays with his family, so he would always set a goal to attend the next holiday gathering.  To do so, he had to endure great amounts of pain while showing courage and mental strength.

I have been in many tough situations in my life and often think back to this to keep me going.  I learned this lesson at a young age, but it took some time for me to learn to apply it properly.  The lesson it reinforced for me was to never give up and never forget your “why.”  When your why is strong enough, you can achieve and overcome far more than you ever dreamed. 

A trait I admire. Toughness is a trait that I truly admire. When I say that, you may have the idea that I’m referring to big muscles and physical prowess.  That can apply, but toughness to me goes far beyond the physical.  In my opinion, toughness is about mental strength, determination, and tenacity in the face of obstacles.

I like to feel I can identify toughness easily. Unfortunately, I do not see it as often as I’d like these days.  However, it is always interesting to me where it can be found.  Some of the truly toughest people I have encountered are women and/or mothers for example.  Toughness usually bares itself with a quiet and humbled resolve to keep going.  Many of the people whom I consider the toughest would likely never refer to themselves as such, but truly are.

Something worth trying.  Recently, I have been going through the process of evaluating various aspects of my life and asking myself what 3-5 things I could improve.  For example, I ask myself this question as a chiropractor, father, husband, athlete, coach, and more.   

The goal of this endeavor is not to become negative, but rather to look for avenues of improvement.  It’s been worth it for me to find small changes or additions I can make to improve myself.  The beauty of doing this is, you’re coming up with answers before you’re forced to.  You can identify ways to improve without being in an emotional or crisis state.  Give this a try, I promise it will be worth it!

Something I believe.  As a chiropractor, I am a believer that whenever possible you should seek out a cure to a problem rather than masking it.  This applies in many ways.  One way in particular is creating the best version of you possible.

This means that if you want more money, better relationships, whatever; you must produce the best version of yourself possible.  If you do that, those things will come more easily.  There is not an endeavor or situation you can name that would not benefit from you being the best version of yourself mentally, physically, emotionally, and more.  Become the best you possible mentally, physically, emotionally, spiritually, etc. and you will be thrilled at what it leads to in your life. 

Some quotes I love. 

“What we fear doing most is usually what we most need to do.” – Tim Ferriss

“Only the fittest of the fittest shall survive, stay alive.” – Bob Marley, Could You Be Loved

“Sometimes you have to get knocked down lower than you have ever been, to stand up taller than you ever were.”

“When setting out on a journey, do not seek advice from those who have never left home.” – Rumi

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – March 25th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – March 18th

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On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

Something I am thankful for.  I began doing these 5 Spots about 3 years ago.  I started by emailing them to a few hundred patients and then later, posting them on my website.  My goal was to journal my thoughts in a format that my children could one day refer to.  At the same time, my hope was that people I sent them to, would find value in them as well.  Though the group reading them was small, the feedback was immediately positive.

The other day I was made aware these 5 Spots have been read well over a million times, which shocked me.  It has been fun to see the readership grow throughout the years, and I was humbled by it.  More importantly to me, however, each week I hear from at least one person that tells me something I wrote resonated with them, inspired them, and caused them to take an action.  Combined with the fact that my older sons now read these columns each week on their own, gives me great pride.  I am extremely grateful for all of you that take the time to read these.  Writing this each week has become a big part of my life that I truly enjoy.  Thank you!

A piece of advice I love.  There is a saying I often think to myself and tell others when the situation dictates, “Be a grown up.”  This is a general statement, but it encompasses a lot.  To me, this simple declaration is a reminder of how to do things properly. 

In my opinion, being a grown up means to be responsible, not complain, show up on time, see things through, give appropriate effort, plan, and much more.  Reminding yourself to act like a grown-up will help guide your behavior toward something productive.

A workout I always enjoy.  Anytime we get a snowstorm, I make it a point to go for a run.  Each time I do so, I get odd looks from neighbors and people shoveling driveways or driving past.  To most, running in cold temperatures and bad elements is terrible and foolish, but I like it.

I always enjoy how quiet and serene things are when the snow is coming down and I love when my footprints are the only ones I see.  More importantly, these runs in challenging elements help get me comfortable being uncomfortable.  This fuels my mental resolve and helps me view challenges in a more positive light.  Whether it’s freezing cold, snow, or the hottest days of the year; I like to train in the toughest elements because it helps me become physically and mentally tougher in my daily life.

A concept I like.  We all have things that stress us out.  Work, finances, relationships, words someone said, world events, etc.  I call these things “mental rent.”  Just as you don’t want to pay too much rent for the place you live or work, you want to work at keeping your mental rent low.

For example, if you are unable to pursue a healthy relationship with someone because you are still getting over how badly an ex treated you years ago, you are paying that person a very high mental rent.  Mental rent is important to understand because the more bandwidth you spend on negativity, the less you’ll have to create progress and growth.  If you’re thinking about someone, something, a past event, whatever, ask yourself if it’s worth putting your hard-earned mental rent toward.  

Some quotes I love. 

“The ones who say you can’t and won’t are probably the ones who are scared that you will.” – Zig Ziglar

“Winners are not people who never fail.  They are people that never quit.”

“Success requires commitment, not a miracle.”

“Men’s best successes come after their disappointments.” – Henry Ward Beecher

“Your toughness is made up of equal parts persistence and experience. You don’t so much outrun your opponents as outlast and outsmart them, and the toughest opponent of all is the one inside your head.” – Joe Henderson

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
  • Interested in weight loss, more energy, enhanced performance and more?  Respond to this email and we can add you to Dr. Kenney’s email list for SAM Designer Health, his nutrition and exercise business!
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – March 18th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – March 11

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On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

Something I believe is important.  One of the things I tell myself each day is to “play with fire”, meaning do everything with a high level of energy and purpose.  In my experience, far too many people go about their days with low energy, just going through the motions.  This is not fun for them or those they interact with.

I believe that if you’re going to do something, you want to give it all the energy you can.  This leads to better focus and success.  It also positively influences other people, events, and results in positive changes within your life.  I am not suggesting you behave in a manner that is not authentic, but you should take steps to ensure that you are going through each day with as much vitality and intention as possible.

An interesting observation. “Give 100%” is a saying we all hear often.  Many people say they are giving one hundred percent, but I do not believe this is always (or even frequently) the case.  The easiest way for me to tell the truth of someone’s effort is by observing patterns.

When I encounter someone that wants to tell me how much effort they’ve put in and how there’s nothing else they could/should be doing differently, these are never the people giving all they have.  People like this usually want you to agree that they’ve exhausted all their options and praise them for what they’ve done.  Not surprisingly, they often blame circumstances or luck for their lack of results and never themselves. 

Conversely, the most successful people I have ever met always feel they can give more.  They do not look for a pat on the back for their efforts, take personal responsibility for all outcomes good or bad, and always seek improvement.  In my life, I have fallen into both categories at times, but my goal for years now has been to only behave as the second group does, taking full responsibility and always seeking to give more.

Something I admire.  I’ve had recent conversations with friends that recently tried to accomplish some amazing things and failed.  Some were in business, some physical, but all were lofty goals that came up short.  Though these people didn’t “succeed” how they expected, I greatly admire them.

We live in a world where it is common for people to play small, take no risks, and then criticize others for taking a shot and failing.  I do not understand that way of thinking.  I would much rather have the guts to go after a big goal than play it safe and not try.  A failure can become fuel for future endeavors so there is never a reason not to try.  Never be afraid to go out on your shield, only be afraid to tuck it between your legs.

Reminder of a great lesson.  I listened to our pastor speak the other day and he mentioned what starts off working will often cease to do so after a period of time.  At that point, you must change if you wish to have success going forward.  This is true in business, marriages, sports, physical endeavors, and much more.

Adaptability is a trait we should strive for because nothing remains the same forever.  As things stop working as they once did or as we’d like, we are faced with two choices.  First, we can complain and/or reminisce how things once were and decide it’s unfair that we’re not still obtaining the same results.  The second choice is that we acknowledge change is necessary, and then adjust.  It’s a simple choice but one that is often surprisingly difficult. 

Some quotes I love. 

“Generally, when a leader struggles, the root cause behind the problem is that the leader has leaned too far in one direction and steered off course.” – Jocko Willink

“Never let people who choose the path of least resistance steer you away from your chosen path of most resistance.” – David Goggins

“Wrong is wrong even if everyone is doing it.  Right is right even if no one is doing it.”

“A child without discipline is a child without love.” – Mr. Rogers

“Discipline is not about being abusive; it’s about setting firm rules and boundaries and then enforcing them.” – Joe De Sana

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – March 11
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – March 4th

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On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

How do you get used to running for so long?  After I mentioned the 34-mile run I did in my brother in law’s honor a few weeks ago, I have gotten this question a lot from patients.  The honest answer is that you don’t.

What happens when you present yourself with significant challenges repeatedly is, they never become easy.  Rather, your ability to adapt when things get tough increases.  For example, I have never run thirty, fifty, or one hundred miles and thought it was a breeze.  It’s always grueling but I have developed the ability to make mental, physical, nutritional, and other adjustments where it never seems insurmountable. 

This same premise applies to our daily lives as well.  As we face challenges, we do not become immune to them, but we become more resilient.  Situations that would have once kept us down no longer have the power to do so.    

An important concept.  I’ve had recent dealings with a small business owner making common mistakes.  Blaming others, spending money looking for the magic bullet, ignoring the need to work hard as an individual, worrying about the future while ignoring the present, micro-managing, and more.  This reminded me of the importance of leadership.  When the leader of an organization, team, or family displays shaky leadership, it has an unsettling effect on those around them.  It’s like the captain of a ship not knowing what direction to proceed. 

Leadership to me is not a one-time event or series of words.  Rather, it is the actions that a leader displays to those around them.  When those actions show consistency, integrity, intelligence, planning, etc., it builds confidence in those around them which leads to better performance.  When a leader displays poor qualities such as indecisiveness, quick temper, failure to take responsibility, lack of drive, poor preparation, etc. it leads those around them to lose focus, interest, and productivity.   Strong leaders are crucial to families, businesses, teams, and all groups of people.

A great lesson.  My youngest son is 3 ½ years old and says “I love you” all the time.  He’ll say it to me, his mom, and then list off his siblings, and grandparents.  What he does every time that I like is that he includes his own name in there.  He tells himself that he loves himself.

Though he’s so young, this is a lesson for all of us. Sometimes we forget to love ourselves but it’s crucial.  We often have kindness and compassion for those around us and talk to ourselves in a way we never would to others.  Take a lesson from my son and “love you some you!”

Something I often hear.  “I don’t have time.”  I hear this often about exercise, self-care, business matters, and more.  This is usually another way of saying it’s not a priority and I don’t think I’ve ever heard it from someone that is incredibly successful or legitimately busy.

High performing people always prioritize what is important and get what must be done finalized.  Conversely, those that are scattered often do a lot, but much of it is unimportant and could be avoided by prioritizing better.  Anyone can be busy, being productive is the key.  If you find yourself saying you don’t have time, take a hard look at where some of that time is going, and you may be surprised how much you can free up.

Some quotes I love.

“Failure is not aiming too high and missing.  Failure is aiming too low and hitting.” – Marc Mero

“Behind every strong person is a story that gave them two choices:  sink or swim.”

“There are no traffic jams on the extra mile.” – Zig Ziglar

“Sometimes the reason that you’re suffering is because you won’t let go of the things that’s biting you.” – Jordan Peterson

“Life’s greatest rewards are reserved for those who demonstrate a never-ending commitment to act until they achieve.  This level of resolve can move mountains, but it must be constant and consistent.” – Tony Robbins

“The repetition of affirmation leads to belief, and once that belief becomes a deep conviction, things begin to happen.” – Muhammad Ali

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – March 4th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – February 25th

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On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

An important concept.  “Why does this keep happening?”  This is a question I get often from patients regarding a recurring issue such as back pain.  In terms of your spine there are many variables, but the ultimate answer is usually that the person has not changed their behavior.  This is an important concept in chiropractic but even more so in life.

If you are receiving a result that you don’t like but making no effort to get a different outcome, you are earning that result.  We can’t always know instantly what the solution to a problem may be.  However, one certainty is that repeating the same behavior will create the same result.  If you want to change the outcome, focus on what leads you there and make choices according to what you’d like to see happen.  As simple as this is, people often focus too much on what is happening to them and not enough on how much power they have to change it.

A story I love to tell.  About 6 years ago, my oldest son (who was nine at the time) and I ran a race together.  It was an 8-mile run that we’d picked out ahead of time as something that would challenge him.  The race took place in April and 2 days before the race we got about a foot of snow.  The race was still able to be held but the course was snow-covered and temperatures in the single digits. 

As we arrived at the race, we saw many people simply turn around and go home.  They decided it was too cold, they didn’t want to run through snow, and called it a day.  My son and I stayed and ran the race.  He never complained and in a race of hundreds of people, he finished third in his age group of 19 years and younger.

Did he take third place because he ran so fast?  No, because honestly, he did not.  He took third place out of three people.  Dozens signed up within his division but only he and two others showed up to run. My son took third because he suited up, showed up, and persevered. 

This is a powerful and teachable lesson.  We cannot always rely on talent, skill, or good fortune to succeed.  Sometimes the difference between success and failure is having the guts to show up and keep going when others will not.  Also, difficult conditions often present great opportunities for those willing to seize them. 

Something I heard and loved.  I was watching a motivational video on YouTube by Eric Thomas, and he said, “You can’t just have energy when you have energy.”  This resonated with me.  To me, this is all about maintaining your level of exertion when your body and mind are telling you it’s ok to rest. 

When I run, I don’t find out what I’m made of until the wheels fall off the bus and I’m exhausted, in pain, and/or facing more miles still to go.  During a workout, the reps that really matter are the ones I struggle to barely get when my muscles feel like they want to give out.  Many of my best moments with my children are when I find just a little bit more energy to play with them when I am exhausted after a long day.  Many of my best adjustments are those that I’ve fit into a hectic schedule when I didn’t feel like I had the juice to do another.

The point I took from Eric’s great quote is that the ultimate test is how you’ll behave when you have little to nothing left.  Everyone succeeds when things are good, and their tank is full.  The special people succeed when they’re exhausted and at less than 100%!

Something I have found to be true.  When we are facing challenges be it physical and/or mental, things can get rough. Sometimes we feel we are making little progress and the task can seem insurmountable.  What I have learned challenging myself physically and mentally through my workouts, habits, competitions, and more is the cardinal sin you can make is to whine, complain, or tell yourself or others how difficult something is and how hard it will be to complete. 

When you take a tough situation and add negativity to it, things will instantly shift from difficult to impossible.  Complaining also causes collateral damage by affecting everyone around it.  When you complain, you take someone near you off their track and make it tougher on them.

I talked with a long-time patient of mine this week going through another bout of cancer.  As he caught me up on what was going on with his health, I commended him on how positively he has dealt with everything.  He told me he didn’t see any other way to go through difficult times other than taking it one step at a time and as positively as possible.  If he were not this way, his tough situation would be exponentially worse. We cannot always control what we go through, but we do have the power to make it better by focusing on how we go through it.

Some quotes I love.

“Every man dies, not every man lives.” – William Wallace

“Don’t expect front row seats if you’re giving nosebleed effort.” – Eric Thomas

“The most unconscionable acts in human history were conducted by those ‘just following orders.’” – Tim Kennedy

“There are only two options:  1.  Make Progress.  2.  Make excuses.” – Mark Devine

“When one has nothing to lose, one becomes courageous.  We are timid only when there is something we can still cling to.” – Ian Smith

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – February 25th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – February 18th

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On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

An important question to ask yourself.  The technology we use is constantly upgraded.  Our phones, televisions, software, etc. are always moving from one version to another.  As this occurs, we expect the most updated version will be better in some way than its predecessor.  This is how it should work for people as well.  Therefore, a good question to ask is whether you are currently a better version of yourself than you were last month/year/decade/etc.?

The key is not to make this assessment simply based on age (you’ll be older, that’s a given).  Factors to consider are your levels of activity, priorities, relationships with those important to you, level of happiness, contentment, and on and on.  Ideally, you should look back and see progress in different areas.  If you do not feel this is the case, what can you do differently to change that?  The goal is not to be perfect but simply to be moving forward.

Something I believe in.  When I was early in my career, my boss and chiropractic mentor told me about “outflows.”  These are small acts of gratitude that you say or do for someone.  For example, one of my son’s former coaches is a part of a church group that he attends.  His words have aided and helped my son, so last week I took a little time and wrote this coach a nice message, about what a great mentor and role model he’s been for my son and the other young men.  He was extremely appreciative of this gesture.

We live in a world that can be negative at times.  Taking a little bit of time to point out to someone that they’ve helped you, you liked something they did, can be extremely powerful.  Sometimes that one act of kindness can motivate them in ways you may never fully appreciate.  Don’t be afraid to say or do something nice for someone else!

A type of workout I’ve been enjoying.  This week I began experimenting with “tabatas” within my workouts.  Tabata is a term for an interval workout where there is a period of extreme exertion followed by a rest period and then the cycle is repeated.  Commonly the exertion is for 20 seconds, and the rest is 10 seconds with the length of the tabata totaling 4 minutes.

These can be done with cardiovascular exercise such as in a spin class, but I’ve been incorporating them into my weight workouts.  For example, I’ll do a moderate weight on squats for 20 seconds, rest 10 seconds and then repeat that again until 4 minutes are up.  You may be thinking that 4 minutes isn’t long but if you do this properly, it’ll be a true challenge.  Best of all, for those of you who do not have much equipment to work out with, you can make amazing workouts using this style using nothing but bodyweight exercises. 

A good reminder.  Recently I made the decision to get involved in a new business endeavor involving nutrition and exercise.  This is an area in which I am passionate and have decades of experience.  However, as with any new venture, there is a lot to do. As someone that thrives on routine, I have found myself thinking about all that needs to get done, and struggling to make sure I find the time to do everything.  Though this is challenging, it is an excellent reminder.

I believe you should always strive to have something in your life that challenges or scares you a little.  These are the types of things that keep you focused and draw you a little further out of your comfort zone.  Whether it’s a new business, side hustle, speaking engagement, signing up for a competition or something else, it’s great to have a challenging goal in front of you that you need to work hard to achieve!

Some quotes I love.

“If you don’t fight for what you want, don’t cry for what you lose.”

“You never hear stories about people who quit.” – Commander David Sears

“I want to be in the arena.  I want to be brave with my life.  And when we make the choice to dare greatly, we sign up to get our asses kicked.  We can choose courage, or we can choose comfort, but we can’t have both.  Not at the same time.” – Brene Brown

“You’ll never be criticized by someone who is doing more than you.  You’ll always be criticized by someone doing less.  Remember that.” – Denzel Washington

“The only thing standing between you and your dream is the bullsh** story you keep telling yourself as to why you can’t achieve it.” 

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – February 18th
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Dr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – February 11th

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On Fridays I like to share experiences I’ve had during the week with patients and in my personal life that I’ve found significant.  I like to share them in hopes that you might find value in them and have something resonate with you in your life.   

A recent experience.  As many of you know, last Friday I ran thirty-four miles to honor my brother-in-law who would have turned thirty-four that day.  Halfway through my pre-planned route, I came to my first series of trails.  Due to the snow last week still being on the ground, the footing was not great, but it was well traveled and not terrible.  After a few miles of that, I came upon the beginning of a 7-mile section of trail that didn’t appear to have so much as a single footprint on it.  That would mean I’d be blazing my own trail in the cold through ten inches of snow, up and down hills; not ideal for any long run.

At this point, I had the choice to either continue my current route knowing it would be hard, or detour to paved roads and make it easier.  I chose the hard way and it ended up being more challenging than I expected, each mile feeling as if it were three.  It was cold, I fell several times, I was in pain, and was in the middle of nowhere.

All that said, this is the portion I’ll look back on and remember fondly.  When you challenge yourself and then overcome, there is a feeling of accomplishment and pride.  Trudging through that snow alone, I talked aloud to my late brother-in-law often, and brought myself into a stronger mental state than when I began the run.  If it doesn’t challenge you, it won’t change you so remember to seek out those challenges when you can.

Something I believe.  Focusing on winning is extremely important.  It helps keep us driven, determined, and with an eye on the end goal.  This is crucial but things do not always end up as we’d like.  For that reason, I believe something that is just as important as winning is learning how to take a loss.

I saw several examples over the past week of people or groups that lost in various endeavors and behaved shamefully.  They made excuses, involved people that didn’t need to be, cried foul, said things weren’t fair, and on and on.  They compounded their loss by embarrassing themselves with poor behavior.

No one should ever want to lose.  But if it happens, there are ways to handle it so that it turns into something positive in the future.  Evaluate your performance, ask what you could have done differently, what can be improved, what you learned, etc.  Do not make excuses, feel sorry for yourself, or get down.  Take it on the chin, own it, and grow from it.

Something I heard and loved.  One of my son’s previous football coaches spoke at his church group this week.  He told a story (that I was in attendance to witness) from 2 years ago.  They were playing in a tight game against an extremely physical team that was hitting hard and talking a lot.  They hit our quarterback often and got into his head.  He came to the sideline to get a play from the coach facing a 4th and 32, down 6 points, with under a minute left in the game.

He told the coach that he was scared.  The coach asked if he meant scared about the situation or getting hurt and the player told him that he was just scared.  At that point, his coach told him the play and told him that one of the players would be open on this play, that he’d make a perfect throw to him and that they’d score and win.  That is exactly what happened.  He completed a 74-yard touchdown pass on that play and my son’s team won one of the craziest games I’ve ever seen.

The point the coach made by telling this story was that sometimes in life, you may not believe in yourself.  In those times, it may be the words of someone else that help you.  Furthermore, there will be times when it’s you that needs to hear these words and other times when you are the person that must deliver them to someone else.  When used properly, there is great power in your words to help others, and theirs to help you!

A concept I believe in.  In the lead up to the memorial run I did for my brother-in-law last week; I was asked by many patients and friends what my backup plan was.  In other words, what would I do if it were cold, if it snowed, if the roads and trails were tough to run on, etc.?  Would I postpone, and if so, to when?  My answer was that I was going when I’d planned regardless. 

When there is something important to you, do not allow yourself to negotiate it with anyone (including yourself).  Honor your commitment in the way you promised and give all you have.  If it seems like it will be harder than you expected for some reason, begin it anyway.  Honor your commitments by showing up and giving nothing less than your best.

Some quotes I love.

“Whatever you are not changing, you are choosing.”

“Your energy introduces you before you even speak.” – Kate Broddick

“Don’t watch the clock; do what it does.  Keep going.” – Sam Levenson

“Food is the most overused anxiety drug.  Exercise is the most underutilized antidepressant.” – JJ Virgin

“Freedom is not a reward for compliance.  That’s how jails work.”

“It will be hard but hard does not mean that it will be impossible.”

Want more?

  • Don’t forget to follow Dr. Kenney on Instagram @Coloradochiropractor
  • To see previous Friday 5 Spots, visit www.newbodychiro.com
  • Check us out on Facebook under New Body Chiropractic
Matt KenneyDr. Kenney’s Friday 5 Spot – February 11th
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